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Ch 2: Theories of Crime: Help and Review

About This Chapter

The Theories of Crime chapter of this Intro to Criminal Justice Help and Review course is the simplest way to master an understanding of crime theories. This chapter uses simple and fun videos that are about five minutes long, plus lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure students learn the essentials of crime theories.

Who's it for?

Anyone who needs help learning or mastering introductory criminal justice material will benefit from taking this course. There is no faster or easier way to learn introductory criminal justice. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who have fallen behind in understanding theories of crime
  • Students who struggle with learning disabilities or learning differences, including autism and ADHD
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning criminal justice (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who need an efficient way to learn about theories of crime
  • Students who struggle to understand their teachers
  • Students who attend schools without extra criminal justice learning resources

How it works:

  • Find videos in our course that cover what you need to learn or review.
  • Press play and watch the video lesson.
  • Refer to the video transcripts to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with short quizzes.
  • Verify you're ready by completing the Theories of Crime chapter exam.

Why it works:

  • Study Efficiently: Skip what you know, review what you don't.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging animations and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Use the Theories of Crime chapter exam to be prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any question on crime theories. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: Watch videos on any web-ready device.

Students will review:

In this chapter, you'll learn the answer to questions including:

  • How does the classical school of criminology influence criminological theorizing today?
  • What are the crime control and due process models of criminology?
  • What are some biological theories of crime?
  • What is the individual trait theory of criminology?
  • How does social disorganization relate to crime?

27 Lessons in Chapter 2: Theories of Crime: Help and Review
Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

1. Labeling Theory and Crime: Stigma & Retrospective and Projective Labeling

Labeling others is common in our society. In this lesson, we discuss the specifics of labeling theory, including when and why people are labeled. We also distinguish between retroactive and projective labeling and briefly discuss Travis Hirschi's control theory.

Ulterior Motive: Definition & Law

2. Ulterior Motive: Definition & Law

This lesson will cover the concept of an ulterior motive as an explanation for both criminal and police behavior. We will define it and then explain the case of Whren v. U.S. (1996), which debates the ulterior motives of the police when conducting traffic stops.

Definition of Economic, Racial & Gender Disparity

3. Definition of Economic, Racial & Gender Disparity

In this lesson, we'll discuss what economic, racial, and gender disparities are and how they impact those who interact with the criminal justice system in the United States.

Broken Windows Theory: Definition & Example

4. Broken Windows Theory: Definition & Example

In this lesson, the broken window theory will be defined and examples given. Its implementation will also be discussed. There is a quiz at the end of the lesson.

Victim Precipitation: Definition & Theory

5. Victim Precipitation: Definition & Theory

Victim precipitation refers to the interactions of victims with those who commit crimes against them. In this lesson, you will be introduced to the theory of victim precipitation through definitions and examples.

Chronic Offender: Definition & Criminology

6. Chronic Offender: Definition & Criminology

In this lesson, we will define what a chronic offender is in the study of criminology. We will also provide a bit of insight into how individuals become classified as chronic offenders and offer a few theoretical explanations as to how individuals are situated in society as chronic offenders.

Legal Positivism: Definition, Pros & Cons

7. Legal Positivism: Definition, Pros & Cons

In this lesson, we learn about legal positivism, which is an example of a philosophy of law or school of legal jurisprudence. You also complete a quiz to test your understanding.

Trait Theory of Leadership in Criminology: Definition & Summary

8. Trait Theory of Leadership in Criminology: Definition & Summary

This lesson defines the trait theory of leadership and its role in criminology. It also provides criticisms of the theory and discusses recent contributions that address some of the problems within the theory.

Neoclassical Criminology: School & Theory

9. Neoclassical Criminology: School & Theory

Neoclassical criminology is a school of thought that is defined by a number of different theories. In this lesson, you will gain an introductory understanding of neoclassical criminology and its primary theoretical assumptions about crime and punishment.

Suspect: Definition, Classification & Behavior

10. Suspect: Definition, Classification & Behavior

In crime scene investigations, the missing link of the puzzle is just that.... the suspect - the person who fills in the blanks. Learn what a suspect is, how to identify and classify suspects' behaviors, and why this is important to investigations.

Legal Moralism: Definition & Examples

11. Legal Moralism: Definition & Examples

Legal moralism is the belief that acts may be criminalized on the basis of their immorality. Examples of legal moralism can be found in anti-gambling, anti-prostitution, and anti-bigotry laws.

Reintegrative Shaming: Definition & Theory in Criminology

12. Reintegrative Shaming: Definition & Theory in Criminology

This lesson will define Braithwaite's theory of reintegrative shaming in criminology, articulate how it differs from other criminological theories that attempt to explain causes of crime, discuss a few challenges to the theory, and offer scenarios of how the theory may be applied.

Atavism in Criminology: Definition & Meaning

13. Atavism in Criminology: Definition & Meaning

In this lesson, we'll discuss the meaning of the term atavism, when it emerged in the field of criminology, the theories of crime it relates to, the criminologist it's primarily associated with, and why it's no longer used in criminology.

Somatotype: Definition & Theory

14. Somatotype: Definition & Theory

In this lesson, we will define the three types of somatotypes. we'll also explore how somatotypes have contributed to criminological theory, and present some visual examples of individuals who match the body types.

Neutralization Theory in Criminology: Definition & Challenges

15. Neutralization Theory in Criminology: Definition & Challenges

In this lesson, we'll discuss neutralization theory and its origins in criminology. We'll also explore how neutralization theory is used to explain criminal behavior as well as challenges to the theory itself.

Social Process Theories in Criminology

16. Social Process Theories in Criminology

In this lesson, we will discuss the concept of social process in criminology. We will also look at how it relates to symbolic interactionism and how this framework is used in several different criminological theories.

Cycle of Violence: Theory & Diagram

17. Cycle of Violence: Theory & Diagram

The cycle of violence is typically associated with violence that occurs in the context of interpersonal relationships. It is a theoretical model used to explain the patterns of behavior on the parts of the victim and the aggressor. This lesson will explain the steps in that cycle.

Biological Determinism: Definition & Theory

18. Biological Determinism: Definition & Theory

In this lesson, you will gain an introductory understanding of 'biological determinism' as a theoretical perspective and learn the key assumptions it makes about the causes of criminal behavior. A brief quiz follows the lesson.

Stockholm Syndrome: Definition, Cases & Treatment

19. Stockholm Syndrome: Definition, Cases & Treatment

Why is it that victims of violent crimes sometimes bond with the perpetrators? This lesson defines Stockholm syndrome, examines cases in which victims have developed this syndrome and discusses treatment options.

Assumption of Risk: Definition, Doctrine & Examples

20. Assumption of Risk: Definition, Doctrine & Examples

After completing this lesson, you will have a thorough understanding of the assumption of risk doctrine. Additionally, you will review examples of this concept in the legal world.

Children Living in Poverty: Facts, Effects & Statistics

21. Children Living in Poverty: Facts, Effects & Statistics

More than 14% of the U.S. population lives in poverty. The most innocent victims are the children. Let's take a look at what children of poverty may experience, including health issues, homelessness, inadequate education experiences, and even violence.

Ecological Fallacy: Definition & Example

22. Ecological Fallacy: Definition & Example

This lesson discusses the concept of an ecological fallacy within the context of understanding how logical arguments are structured. We will learn about the concept and then discuss an example of an ecological fallacy.

Inchoate Crimes: Definition & Examples

23. Inchoate Crimes: Definition & Examples

In law, there is a certain type of crime called an 'inchoate crime'. Learn what constitutes an inchoate crime, and see examples to get a thorough understanding of what inchoate crimes are.

Sex Offenders: Definition, Types, Laws & Rights

24. Sex Offenders: Definition, Types, Laws & Rights

Learn about sex offenders. Specifically, review the definition of a sex offender and the different types of offenses. Moreover, we'll also examine the laws on sex offenses and the rights of sex offenders. Then you can test your knowledge with a quiz.

The Dark Figure of Crime: Definition & Statistics

25. The Dark Figure of Crime: Definition & Statistics

In this lesson, you'll learn what constitutes the dark figure of crime theory. Moreover, you'll review the definition of the theory. Finally, you'll examine several crime statistics.

Victimology: Definition, Theory & History

26. Victimology: Definition, Theory & History

Victimology is the study of victims of crimes. In this lesson, learn about the relationships between victims and perpetrators, the theories about victimology, and the history of victimology.

Probable Cause vs. Reasonable Suspicion

27. Probable Cause vs. Reasonable Suspicion

Probable cause and reasonable suspicion are two legal terms often used by law enforcement and in police work. This lesson will define these terms and distinguish them from each other by providing examples.

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