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Ch 19: Theories of Criminal Behavior

About This Chapter

Check out this self-paced chapter on criminal behavior theories to get ahead in class, prepare for an exam or earn continuing education credit. These short lessons and quizzes can be accessed on any computer or mobile device, which helps you study at home, at school or wherever you happen to be.

Theories of Criminal Behavior - Chapter Summary

If you need to review theories of criminal behavior, you're in the right place. This collection of engaging video lessons offers clear explanations of criminal behavior theories and concepts, including social process theories, the naturalization theory, victimology and the dark figure of crime. Our lessons are simple and engaging, and each lesson comes with a self-assessment quiz to help you retain important information. Our expert criminal justice instructors are available to answer any questions you may have. You can also access the chapter on any device that has an Internet connection. By the end of the chapter, you should be able to:

  • Summarize the history of crime in the U.S.
  • Identify societal and personal factors related to violence in America
  • Discuss the nature of crime measurement programs
  • Explain how demographics contribute to crime and how the media affects violence
  • Interpret statistics related to the dark figure of crime
  • Explain social process theories and the naturalization theory in criminology
  • Define victimology

7 Lessons in Chapter 19: Theories of Criminal Behavior
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
History & Trends of Crime in the United States

1. History & Trends of Crime in the United States

United States crime trends have fluctuated throughout history. This lesson takes a brief look at the history of crime in the U.S., crime rates over time and current trends.

Violence in America: Societal & Personal Factors

2. Violence in America: Societal & Personal Factors

More than just economic factors play a role in the potential for someone to commit a violent crime. Some other types of factors that may contribute to someone committing a violent crime are discussed here as well.

Crime Measurement Programs: History & Nature

3. Crime Measurement Programs: History & Nature

Watch this lesson to learn about how crime is measured in the United States. Examine the two main sources of criminal statistics and discover what each source of information can reveal.

How Demographics Contribute to Crime

4. How Demographics Contribute to Crime

This lesson examines how demographics can tell us about crime. Review how social class relates to crime. In addition, examine how age, gender, and race are related to crime.

The Dark Figure of Crime: Definition & Statistics

5. The Dark Figure of Crime: Definition & Statistics

In this lesson, you'll learn what constitutes the dark figure of crime theory. Moreover, you'll review the definition of the theory. Finally, you'll examine several crime statistics.

Victimology: Definition, Theory & History

6. Victimology: Definition, Theory & History

Victimology is the study of victims of crimes. In this lesson, learn about the relationships between victims and perpetrators, the theories about victimology, and the history of victimology.

Violence and the Media: How the Media Impacts Violence

7. Violence and the Media: How the Media Impacts Violence

For years, psychologists have studied the effect watching violent media has on people's behavior. In this lesson, we'll look at the link between media violence and real-life aggression and discover why watching violent TV might affect people's levels of aggression.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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