Ch 6: Tools for Reading Comprehension

About This Chapter

Different points of view as well as different narrative voices will be among the reading comprehension tools included in this chapter. The chapter features engaging video lessons, transcripts, and animations to make the material engaging and informative.

Tools for Reading Comprehension - Chapter Summary

This chapter's lessons will refresh your memory on the differences between allusion and illusion. Types of irony are defined and distinguished. After you've reviewed the videos, you should have a solid understanding of these topics:

  • Foreshadowing
  • Literary motifs
  • Major skills in critical thinking
  • Determing intended audience

View these brief video lessons at the time and place that suit you best on your computer, tablet or smartphone. You can skip portions of the video that you feel solid on, or reexamine a segment by using the video tags to go directly to it. Take each lesson's quick self-assessment quiz to confirm your retention of the material.

9 Lessons in Chapter 6: Tools for Reading Comprehension
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Paragraphs: Definition & Rules

1. Paragraphs: Definition & Rules

Almost all forms of writing are structured into paragraphs. Watch this video lesson to learn not only the definition and purpose of a paragraph but its proper structure and how to make a paragraph effective.

Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

2. Point of View: First, Second & Third Person

Just who is telling this story? In this lesson, we'll look at point of view, or the perspective from which a work is told. We'll review first person, second person and third person points of view.

Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

3. Narrators in Literature: Types and Definitions

Learn how point of view, or the angle from which a story is told, impacts the narrative voice of a work of literature. Explore, through examples, how point of view can be limited, objective, or omniscient.

What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

4. What is Foreshadowing? - Types, Examples & Definitions

Learn about how authors use foreshadowing, both subtle and direct, as part of their storytelling process. Explore many examples of foreshadowing, from classical plays to contemporary stories.

How to Determine the Best Audience or Readers for an Essay

5. How to Determine the Best Audience or Readers for an Essay

Who should be reading this? Not every essay can be enjoyed by everyone equally. How do you know who is the best target for an essay? This lesson will help you figure that out.

Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

6. Types of Irony: Examples & Definitions

Discover, once and for all, what irony is and is not. Explore three types of irony: verbal, situational and dramatic, and learn about some famous and everyday examples.

Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

7. Allusion and Illusion: Definitions and Examples

Allusions and illusions have little in common besides the fact that they sound similar. Learn the difference between the two and how allusions are an important part of literature and writing - and how to spot them in text.

What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

8. What Are Literary Motifs? - Definition & Examples

In this lesson, you will learn about how writers use themes in works of literature as a way to explore universal ideas like love and war. You will also explore motifs, or repeating objects and ideas, which can contribute to theme.

Style in Literature: Definition, Types & Examples

9. Style in Literature: Definition, Types & Examples

In this lesson, you'll learn what style means in literature and how to identify the four most popular writing styles. These include expository, descriptive, persuasive, and creative writing styles. Afterwards, take a quiz to test your knowledge.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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