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Ch 21: Torts in Business Law Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The Torts in Business Law chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach the types of torts and defenses in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the Torts in Business Law chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

DayTopicsKey Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday Tort law;
Battery;
Assault;
Examples of tort law;
Definition of battery;
Intentional torts
Tuesday Transferred intent;
Emotional distress;
Torts of economic relations
What is transferred intent;
Definition of emotional distress;
Intentional torts of economic relations
Wednesday Trespass, conversion and nuisance;
Intentional torts;
Negligence torts
Definition of trespass, nuisance and conversion;
Defenses to avoid liability of intentional torts;
Proving negligence
ThursdayNegligence issues Examples of negligence cases;
Types of defenses for negligence;
Defenses in special circumstances
Friday Special torts and situations;
Vicarious liability
Higher standard of care;
Categories of strict liability torts;
Defamation, slander, libel;
Definition of vicarious liability

16 Lessons in Chapter 21: Torts in Business Law Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What Is Tort Law? - Definition and Examples

1. What Is Tort Law? - Definition and Examples

There are three main types of torts that can be charged against a defendant. Learn about the definition of intentional torts, negligence torts, and strict liability torts through real-world examples.

Battery: The Elements of an Intentional Tort

2. Battery: The Elements of an Intentional Tort

Battery is the act of making harmful physical contact with another person. Learn the elements of battery as an intentional tort and examine what defines aggravated battery using a case analysis.

What Is Assault? - Definition of an Intentional Tort

3. What Is Assault? - Definition of an Intentional Tort

Assault, where fear or action of physical harm is instilled against another person, is a form of Tort, where wrong was done to someone in the eyes of the law. Examine the nuances of assault and battery, and aggravated assault with examples.

Transferred Intent for Assault and Battery

4. Transferred Intent for Assault and Battery

The phrase 'I didn't mean to' often carries little weight in court because of the concept of transferred intent, in which an unintended victim was harmed. Learn the nuances of liability and intent in the case of Talmage v. Smith.

Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress: Definition and Examples

5. Intentional Infliction of Emotional Distress: Definition and Examples

The intentional infliction of emotional distress occurs when a person acts outrageously or recklessly with the intent to cause emotional distress to a victim. Learn the definition of the intentional infliction of emotional distress, discover which outrageous acts qualify, and explore examples of how this tort functions in U.S. law.

Intentional Torts of Economic Relations: Definition and Elements

6. Intentional Torts of Economic Relations: Definition and Elements

Competition can drive individuals to intentionally attempt to harm competitors economically, which is called Intentional Torts of Economic Relations. In this lesson, explore the three types of such behavior: injurious falsehood, interference with contractual relations, and interference with prospective advantage.

Trespass, Conversion and Nuisance: Definition and Examples

7. Trespass, Conversion and Nuisance: Definition and Examples

Property owners may find themselves violated by others who commit the intentional torts of trespass, conversion, and nuisance. Explore the definitions and examples of trespass to land and chattel, conversion, and private and public nuisance.

Defenses to Intentional Torts to Avoid Liability

8. Defenses to Intentional Torts to Avoid Liability

An intentional tort occurs when someone knowingly infringes on the rights of others. Learn the four defenses to intentional torts to avoid liability: self defense and dense of others, defense of property, consent, and necessity (public and private).

Negligence Torts: Definition and Cases

9. Negligence Torts: Definition and Cases

Explore the definition of negligence torts and the five elements that prove negligence in a lawsuit: duty, breach of duty, cause in fact, proximate causes, and damages. See examples of negligence tort cases and learn about the Palsgraf case, one of the landmark personal injury cases.

Special Negligence Doctrines: Examples Cases

10. Special Negligence Doctrines: Examples Cases

Special Negligence Doctrines are used to determine if the elements of negligence exist in a court case. Using example cases, determine the difference between the two doctrines, negligence ~'per se~' and ~'res ipsa loquitur.~'

Defenses for Negligence: Definition and Examples

11. Defenses for Negligence: Definition and Examples

Negligence is a type of accusation brought against a defendant in court. Learn the definition of negligence as well as examples of the three categories of defenses for negligence: pure, modified, and slight-gross.

Other Defenses to Negligence

12. Other Defenses to Negligence

A tort is a civil cause of action based on someone's negligence, which allows the victim to sue the tortfeasor for damages. Explore the Rescue Doctrine, the Good Samaritan Act, the Fireman's Rule, and the Dram Shop Acts, which are some of the defenses to a tort of negligence.

Defenses for Landowners, Common Carriers, Innkeepers and Social Host Negligence

13. Defenses for Landowners, Common Carriers, Innkeepers and Social Host Negligence

Landowners, common carriers, innkeepers, and social hosts have designated responsibilities and possess legal defenses in accusations of negligence. Take a closer look at all four of these cases and examine common issues of negligence.

Strict Liability Torts: Definition and Examples

14. Strict Liability Torts: Definition and Examples

In strict liability torts, a party can be held responsible for damage inflicted on another party regardless of whether the damage was intentional. Explore the definition, types, and examples of strict liability torts, and how they apply to animals owned or possessed, abnormally dangerous acts, and product liability.

Harm to Reputation or Economic Interests: Defamation, Libel, & Slander

15. Harm to Reputation or Economic Interests: Defamation, Libel, & Slander

Defamatory statements are false statements that cause harm to the reputation or economic interests of an individual. Learn about defamation, the difference between libel and slander, and how the case of Carol Burnett v. National Enquirer, Inc. illustrates the need to prove malice in defamation lawsuits.

What Is Vicarious Liability? - Definition and Examples

16. What Is Vicarious Liability? - Definition and Examples

When vicarious liability applies to a situation, then a third party may be held responsible for the actions of another party, such as a parent being fined for the actions of their child. Learn the definition of vicarious liability and its different forms, the meaning of negligent entrustment, and explore examples of how indirect parties can be involved in a lawsuit.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in Torts in Business Law Lesson Plans.
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