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Ch 6: Understanding Bonding in Chemistry

About This Chapter

Make sure you fully understand bonding in chemistry before an important exam by reviewing this fun chapter. You'll find short, engaging video lessons that outline these topics clearly and in a mobile-friendly format you can access 24/7.

Understanding Bonding in Chemistry - Chapter Summary

In this chapter, we've provided concise video lessons to help you better understand bonding in chemistry. As you work through these lessons, you'll study different kinds of chemical bonds, the octet rule and Lewis dot structures. Once you finish this chapter, you should be ready to:

  • Differentiate between covalent and ionic chemical bonds
  • Explain why metals are good electrical conductors
  • Detail the octet rule and Lewis structures of atoms
  • Outline single, double and triple bonds in Lewis structures
  • Discuss polyatomic ions and Lewis dot structures
  • Identify the VSEPR theory and molecule shapes

Even the toughest topics are easy to understand with these easy-to-follow lessons. If you don't want to watch the entire video, use the timeline to skip ahead or go back to a specific topic. The videos are accompanied by written transcripts you can print to create study guides to review when you're offline. Help from an instructor is available when you submit your questions through the Dashboard.

6 Lessons in Chapter 6: Understanding Bonding in Chemistry
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Chemical Bonds: Ionic vs. Covalent

1. Chemical Bonds: Ionic vs. Covalent

Atoms make up everything on Earth, and chemical bonds are what hold those atoms together. In this lesson, we'll discuss two very important types of chemical bonds: covalent and ionic.

Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

2. Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

Learn why metallic bonding is called the electron sea model. Discover why metals bond the way they do and why they are shiny, malleable and conduct electricity well.

The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

3. The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

Learn the octet rule and how it applies to electron energy levels. Identify valence electrons and learn how to determine them by looking at the periodic table. Also, discover how they pertain to the octet rule. Learn how to draw the Lewis diagram of an atom, and understand how it provides clues to chemical bonding.

Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

4. Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

Review what a Lewis dot diagram is and discover how to draw a Lewis dot structural formula for compounds. Learn how to represent single, double and triple bonds with lines instead of dots. Also, learn how compounds arrange themselves.

Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

5. Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

This lesson defines Lewis dot structures and explains how to draw them for molecules in step-by-step detail. We'll also explore polyatomic ions and how to draw Lewis dot structures for them.

VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

6. VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

In this lesson, you'll learn about the VSEPR theory and how it can be used to explain molecule shapes. Then, learn how to predict the shape of a molecule by applying the VSEPR theory to the Lewis dot structure.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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