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Ch 5: Understanding Chemical Bonding

About This Chapter

Let our learning materials help you understand chemical bonding, including the types of bonds, Lewis structures and VSEPR theory. These video lessons and quizzes are part of our high school-level physical science resources.

Understanding Chemical Bonding - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

The lessons in this chapter deal with various types of chemical bonds, including ionic, covalent and polar covalent bonds, and explore how an ionic compound is formed. Other lessons look at topics such as the valence bond theory, the molecular orbital theory and VSEPR theory. Experienced instructors will guide you through each lesson, and you can assess your knowledge with the quizzes that accompany each video. By the end of this chapter, you should have an understanding of the following:

  • Chemical bonds
  • The octet rule and Lewis structures
  • How to write ionic compound formulas
  • Properties of covalent compounds
  • Van der Waal's forces
  • Isomers

Video Objective
Chemical Bonds I: Covalent Define molecule, covalent bond, double bond, triple bond and chemical bond.
Chemical Bonds II: Ionic Define ion, ionic bond, cation, anion and electronegativity.
Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent Define polar covalent and nonpolar covalent bonds.
Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen Define hydrogen bond and polar covalent bond.
The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms Describe how to apply the octet rule and draw the Lewis structure of an element.
Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge and Formulas of Ions Describe how ions are formed, predict the charge the ion will have, name the ion and write its formula.
Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties Describe how an ionic compound is formed, define lattice energy and list properties of ionic compounds.
Naming Ionic Compounds: Simple Binary, Transition Metal and Polyatomic Ion Compounds Name and write the formulas for all ionic compounds.
Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming and Formation Describe how covalent compounds are formed and list their properties. Name binary covalent compounds.
Lewis Structures: Single, Double and Triple Bonds Draw Lewis structures of covalent compounds containing single, double and triple bonds.
Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions and Resonance Structures Draw Lewis structures of polyatomic ions and resonance structures.
Covalent Bonds: Predicting Bond Polarity and Ionic Character Using the periodic table, be able to determine the polarity of a bond and determine the amount of ionic character a bond has.
VSEPR Theory and Dipole Moments Predict the shapes of molecules using the VSEPR theory and use the VSEPR structure to determine a molecule's polarity.
Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole and Ion-Dipole Forces: Strong Intermolecular Forces Describe ion-dipole forces, dipole-dipole forces and hydrogen bonding and their effects of properties such as boiling and melting points.
London Dispersion Forces (Van der Waal's Forces): Weak Intermolecular Forces Explain how London dispersion forces are created and what effect it has on properties such as boiling and melting points.
Using Orbital Hybridization and Valences Bond Theory to Predict Molecular Shape Explain how shapes of molecules can be predicted using valence bond theory and hybridization.
Molecular Orbital Theory: Tutorial and Diagrams Sketch the overlap of orbitals to form sigma and pi bonds. Use the theory to determine bond order.
Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model and Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors Describe the electron-sea model of metallic bonding and use it to explain why metals are good electrical conductors and also why they are shiny and malleable.
Intramolecular Bonding and Identification of Organic and Inorganic Macromolecules Understand the bonding in macromolecules and identify both organic and inorganic macromolecules.
Organic Molecules: Alkanes, Alkenes, Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Isomers Distinguish among the structures of alkanes, alkenes and aromatic hydrocarbons. Define isomers.
Functional Groups in Organic Molecules Identify alcohols, alkyl halides, ketones, ethers, carboxylic acids, esters and ethers based on the functional group.

23 Lessons in Chapter 5: Understanding Chemical Bonding
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

1. Chemical Bonds I: Covalent

A covalent bond occurs when two atoms share electrons. Learn about chemical bonding, explore how covalent bonds are made, discover valence electrons, and review molecule structure.

Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

2. Chemical Bonds II: Ionic

Ionic bonds are electrostatic interactions between two oppositely charged ions. Learn about chemical bonding and how ionic bonds form, discover the properties of electronegativity, and review examples of elements containing ionic bonds.

Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

3. Chemical Bonds III: Polar Covalent

A polar covalent bond occurs when two atoms share electrons in an unequal manner. Learn about chemical bonding, how polar covalent bonds form, the difference between polar and nonpolar covalent bonds, and explore the effects of partial changes.

Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

4. Chemical Bonds IV: Hydrogen

Hydrogen bonds are electrostatic interactions that occur when a hydrogen atom binds to an electronegative atom. Learn about chemical bonding, explore how hydrogen bonds form, discover the differences between intramolecular forces and intermolecular forces, then review an example of how these bonds are used.

The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

5. The Octet Rule and Lewis Structures of Atoms

The octet rule and the Lewis dot structure both provide valuable insight into the organization of an atom's valence electrons. Explore the intricacies of the octet rule and learn about the Lewis structures of atoms.

Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

6. Ions: Predicting Formation, Charge, and Formulas of Ions

The octet rule explains how ions are formed. Learn about this rule and use it to predict an ion's formation, charge, and formula, and also understand the role of cations and anions in this process.

Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

7. Ionic Compounds: Formation, Lattice Energy and Properties

Most of the Earth's rocks and minerals are ionic compounds. Learn the definition of an ionic compound, explore its formation and properties, and discover how lattice energy makes iconic compounds stronger.

Naming Ionic Compounds: Simple Binary, Transition Metal & Polyatomic Ion Compounds

8. Naming Ionic Compounds: Simple Binary, Transition Metal & Polyatomic Ion Compounds

An important part of dealing with chemical compounds is knowing how to refer to them. Learn how to name all ionic compounds, including simple binary compounds, compounds containing transition metals and compounds containing polyatomic ions.

Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

9. Covalent Compounds: Properties, Naming & Formation

Covalent compounds are formed when two nonmetal atoms create a covalent bond by sharing valence electrons. Learn about the formation of covalent compounds, the properties and naming of covalent compounds, and the role of valence electrons in the formation of covalent bonds.

Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

10. Lewis Structures: Single, Double & Triple Bonds

Review what a Lewis dot diagram is and discover how to draw a Lewis dot structural formula for compounds. Learn how to represent single, double and triple bonds with lines instead of dots. Also, learn how compounds arrange themselves.

Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

11. Lewis Dot Structures: Polyatomic Ions

Just as the Lewis dot structure can visualize molecules, it can also visualize polyatomic ions, which are ions containing multiple atoms. Explore the actions of polyatomic ions and learn how to visualize them through the lens of the Lewis dot structure.

Lewis Dot Structures: Resonance

12. Lewis Dot Structures: Resonance

Lewis dot structures are diagrams of atoms and valence electrons as they are arranged in a molecule. Review Lewis dot structures and the steps for drawing them, then examine the concept of resonance and resonance structures of Lewis dot structures.

Covalent Bonds: Predicting Bond Polarity and Ionic Character

13. Covalent Bonds: Predicting Bond Polarity and Ionic Character

A covalent bond occurs when atoms share one or more pairs of electrons. Learn about the two types of covalent bonds--nonpolar and polar--and understand how to predict bond polarity. Explore electronegativity and ionic character and recognize the difference between covalent and ionic bonds.

VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

14. VSEPR Theory & Molecule Shapes

The VSEPR theory tells us that molecules take on regular and unique shapes because valence electrons push each other away. Using this theory, you can determine what shape a molecule will take in three-dimensional space, including both electron domain geometry and molecular geometry.

Dipoles & Dipole Moments: Molecule Polarity

15. Dipoles & Dipole Moments: Molecule Polarity

Dipoles and dipole moments occur when electrons are shared unevenly by atoms. Explore the world of molecule polarity, defining covalent bonds, electronegativity, dipoles, and dipole moments, learning how to find a dipole moment, and distinguishing between polar and nonpolar molecules.

Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole & Ion-Dipole Forces: Strong Intermolecular Forces

16. Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole & Ion-Dipole Forces: Strong Intermolecular Forces

Hydrogen bonds are a critical part of many chemical processes, and they help determine the properties of things necessary for life, such as water and protein. Explore hydrogen bonds, as well as dipole-dipole forces, ion-dipole forces, strong intermolecular forces, and intramolecular forces. Understand the effects that intermolecular forces have on certain molecules' properties.

London Dispersion Forces (Van Der Waals Forces): Weak Intermolecular Forces

17. London Dispersion Forces (Van Der Waals Forces): Weak Intermolecular Forces

Learn how London dispersion forces are created and what effect they have on properties such as boiling and melting points. Discover this weak intermolecular force and how it is one of the Van der Waals forces.

Using Orbital Hybridization and Valence Bond Theory to Predict Molecular Shape

18. Using Orbital Hybridization and Valence Bond Theory to Predict Molecular Shape

Hybridization is the process of mixing two or more atomic orbitals to create new covalently bonded orbitals in molecules. However, hybrid orbitals and pure atomic orbitals have different molecular shapes. Learn about orbital hybridization theory, valence bond theory, the difference between sigma and pi bonds, and how to predict the molecular shape of atomic orbitals.

Molecular Orbital Theory: Tutorial and Diagrams

19. Molecular Orbital Theory: Tutorial and Diagrams

The bonds between atoms in molecules have different shapes, sizes, and strengths depending on which atoms are bonded together. Learn how to apply molecular orbital theory to determine the shapes of bonded orbitals, recognize molecular orbital diagrams, calculate bond order, and determine relative bond strength.

Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

20. Metallic Bonding: The Electron-Sea Model & Why Metals Are Good Electrical Conductors

Metallic bonding is known as the electron-sea model. Learn about metallic bonding with an explanation of the unique properties of metals, and understand why metals are good electrical conductors.

Intramolecular Bonding and Identification of Organic and Inorganic Macromolecules

21. Intramolecular Bonding and Identification of Organic and Inorganic Macromolecules

Macromolecules are large molecules made up of monomers that come in two forms, including organic, which includes lipids and proteins, and inorganic, like rubber and diamond. Explore intramolecular bonding and identification of organic and inorganic macromolecules.

Organic Molecules: Alkanes, Alkenes, Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Isomers

22. Organic Molecules: Alkanes, Alkenes, Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Isomers

Organic molecules are comprised of carbon atoms that are covalently bonded with other atoms, such as hydrogen. Learn about organic molecules, the difference between saturated and unsaturated molecules, and how carbon and hydrogen can form different combinations of molecules.

Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

23. Functional Groups in Organic Molecules

Organic molecules have functional groups that determine their classification. Explore the functional groups of organic molecules, including alcohols, alkyl halides, ketones, aldehydes, ethers, carboxylic acids, and esters, and discover the characteristics and formulas that apply to each group.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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