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Ch 2: Understanding Students' Cognitive and Social Development

About This Chapter

Study cognitive and social development concepts as you prepare for the Illinois Licensure Testing Systems (ILTS) school counselor exam. Make studying easier - watch these video lessons and take self-assessment quizzes.

ILTS School Counselor - Understanding Students' Cognitive and Social Development - Chapter Summary

Using engaging video lessons, you can refresh and add to your knowledge of topics covered by the ILTS content-area exam in school counseling. Video instructors use clear, everyday language and examples to make each lesson easy to understand. Lessons in this chapter include:

  • Attribution theory and the principle of locus of control
  • Child and adolescent development: developmental milestones and nature vs. nurture
  • Issues relating to stress and anxiety
  • Learned helplessness in children: definition
  • Maintaining healthy family relationships and understanding the emotional and physical dangers of abuses (e.g., substance, sexual, physical)
  • Moral and prosocial behavior: definitions and examples of classroom applications
  • Processes for conflict resolution and anger management
  • Programs that promote school safety and violence prevention
  • Social and cognitive development: impact on interpersonal relationships
  • Strategies for providing resources to students who are in need of additional professional help
  • Teacher expectations and attributions
  • The role of motivation in self-regulated learning
  • Understanding consequences of decisions and choices and ways to help students understand the relationship among rules, laws, safety and protection of individual rights.
  • Ways to help students understand the need for self-control and management of anger
  • Ways to teach students appropriate strategies for coping with peer pressure and managing life's events

ILTS School Counselor: Objectives

The Illinois Licensure Testing Systems (ILTS) school counselor content-area exam is used to determine your readiness for licensing. You'll earn a score between 100 and 300. You'll need to score at least a 240 to apply for licensing.

The exam requires you to answer 125 multiple-choice questions. At the end of each video lesson, you'll take a self-assessment quiz. This way, you can gauge how well you're learning the material as you go, and you'll gain experience answering questions similar to those found on the exam.

9 Lessons in Chapter 2: Understanding Students' Cognitive and Social Development
The Role of Motivation in Self-Regulated Learning

1. The Role of Motivation in Self-Regulated Learning

Do you monitor and evaluate your own learning? Do you alter the way you study based on performance on assessments? If so, you are engaging in self-regulation practices and, by doing so, increasing the likelihood of academic achievement. This lesson will define self-regulation, discuss the cyclical process of self-regulation and explore methods to promote self-regulation in the classroom.

Attribution Theory and the Principle of Locus of Control

2. Attribution Theory and the Principle of Locus of Control

What do you attribute your successes or failures to? Do you feel like luck and chance are involved, or do you feel like you're in control of your achievements and behavior? This lesson will provide you with an overview of attribution theory and the principles of locus of control.

Learned Helplessness in Children: Definition

3. Learned Helplessness in Children: Definition

Why do people just give up? Why are some situations deemed hopeless? This lesson will introduce you to the concept of learned helplessness in order to answer the above questions and provide recommendations on dealing with learned helplessness in the classroom.

Child and Adolescent Development: Developmental Milestones & Nature vs. Nurture

4. Child and Adolescent Development: Developmental Milestones & Nature vs. Nurture

How does a child develop cognitively? Which influences development more - genetics or the environment? How important are early experiences in the growth and cognitive development of a child? These are some of the major questions that guide the work of researchers in the field of educational psychology. This lesson will begin to address these questions by describing the basic principles that characterize child and adolescent development.

Social & Cognitive Development: Impact on Interpersonal Relationships

5. Social & Cognitive Development: Impact on Interpersonal Relationships

How does association with a group of people impact behavior and learning? Are friendships relevant to understanding the behavior of students in a classroom? This lesson discusses social development by exploring interpersonal relationship functions and types.

Moral & Prosocial Behavior: Definitions & Examples of Classroom Applications

6. Moral & Prosocial Behavior: Definitions & Examples of Classroom Applications

Caring, volunteering, empathizing with others: these are all traits of moral and prosocial behavior. As children age, they develop such moral and prosocial behaviors and traits. This lesson will define these key terms and discuss ways to promote moral and prosocial behavior in the classroom.

Teacher Expectations & Attributions

7. Teacher Expectations & Attributions

Attributions for success and failure drive future expectations for learning and success. Students attribute their successes or failures to a number of factors. Teachers also make attributions for student performance. This lesson will explore teacher expectations and attributions that affect classroom and individual student performance.

Counseling in Elementary Schools

8. Counseling in Elementary Schools

Ever wonder what an elementary school counselor does? In this lesson, we will look into counseling at an elementary school, including types of counseling and strategies used in the process.

Counseling in Middle/Secondary Schools

9. Counseling in Middle/Secondary Schools

How do middle and high school counselors guide their students? In this lesson, we're going to look into the different formats they use and how these benefit their students.

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