Ch 34: Understanding the American Revolution

About This Chapter

This chapter details the American Revolution, beginning with the American Enlightenment to the effects of the Revolutionary War. In the lessons, you will find information about the events and turning points leading up to the American Revolution.

Understanding the American Revolution - Chapter Summary

By utilizing the lessons in the chapter, you will have a fuller understanding of the events leading to the American Revolution, including the intellectual and social revolution during the American Enlightenment. The chapter summarizes the First and Second Great Awakenings as well as their connection to the American Revolution. By the end of this chapter, you should be able to:

  • Discuss key events of the American Enlightenment
  • Detail the popularity of religious revivals
  • Identify the causes of the American Revolution
  • Summarize the text of the Declaration of Independence and share its legacy
  • Explain the effects of the American Revolution

We use short and engaging video lessons to streamline the learning process. You'll have access to self-assessment quizzes and transcripts with each video. All video lessons come with timeline tags so you can access key points quickly. You can check your advancement through the lessons, chapters, or the whole course from your Dashboard.

6 Lessons in Chapter 34: Understanding the American Revolution
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

1. The American Enlightenment: Intellectual and Social Revolution

For a thousand years, Europe had been living in the Dark Ages until a series of philosophical, religious and scientific movements helped turn on the lights. The Enlightenment began in Europe, but quickly spread throughout America in the 1700s and helped set the stage for a revolution against British rule.

The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

2. The First Great Awakening: Religious Revival and American Independence

While the Enlightenment was shaping the minds of 18th-century colonists, another movement, the First Great Awakening, was shaping their hearts. With freedom of conscience at its core, the Awakening led Americans to break with religious traditions and seek out their own beliefs while sharing common values.

Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

3. Causes of the American Revolution: Events & Turning Points

In this lesson, we explore the causes and the initial battles of the American Revolution, from the end of the French and Indian War up until the Declaration of Independence in July, 1776.

The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

4. The Declaration of Independence: Text, Signers and Legacy

After 12 years of tension and fighting, the colonists and their leaders were ready to declare themselves a new country, independent of Great Britain. This lesson examines the motives, the text, and the legacy of America's Declaration of Independence.

The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

5. The Second Great Awakening: Charles Finney and Religious Revival

The spirit of the Revolution led to changes in American churches in the post-war years. Beginning with a boom in evangelism and missionary work, the Second Great Awakening soon led to social reform, an intertwining of religious values with civic values, and a lasting emphasis on morality in daily life.

Effects of the American Revolution: Summary & History

6. Effects of the American Revolution: Summary & History

In this lesson we explore the effects of the American Revolution, which were felt not just in Great Britain and North America, but across the Western world.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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