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Ch 2: Understanding the Types of Jurisdiction

About This Chapter

This self-paced criminal justice chapter helps you improve your understanding of the different types of jurisdiction. Access these short lessons and practice quizzes to get ahead in class, study for an exam or refresh your existing criminal justice knowledge.

Understanding the Types of Jurisdiction - Chapter Summary

If you need to review the different types of jurisdiction, this chapter is for you. Inside the chapter, you'll find bite-sized lessons that compare important jurisdiction types, including original, appellate, general, specific, supplemental, extraterritorial and federal question jurisdiction. When you're finished with each lesson, try the accompanying self-assessment quiz to make sure you fully understand the material. The chapter is available to study at any time, and if you have any questions, our instructors will be happy to help you out. When you're finished with the chapter, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate federal, state and concurrent subject matter jurisdiction
  • Compare original and appellate jurisdiction
  • Differentiate between general and specific jurisdiction
  • Assess court functions pertaining to appellate and original jurisdiction
  • Discuss examples of original jurisdiction, federal question jurisdiction and supplemental jurisdiction
  • Explain how extraterritorial jurisdiction applies to international law
  • Identify types of jurisdiction over property
  • Describe the jurisdiction of the Supreme Court

10 Lessons in Chapter 2: Understanding the Types of Jurisdiction
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Original Jurisdiction? - Definition & Examples

1. What is Original Jurisdiction? - Definition & Examples

Original jurisdiction determines which court will hear a case first. In this article, we'll go over the original jurisdiction of the Supreme Court, federal courts, and state and local courts.

Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

2. Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

One of the ways a court determines whether a case will be heard is based on subject matter jurisdiction. We will explore several factors that determine subject matter jurisdiction in state and federal courts, including concurrent subject matter jurisdiction.

Original Versus Appellate Jurisdiction: Definition & Differences

3. Original Versus Appellate Jurisdiction: Definition & Differences

Federal courts can have either original jurisdiction or appellate jurisdiction. Some courts have both types of jurisdiction. This lesson explains the difference between original jurisdiction and appellate jurisdiction in the federal court system.

General vs. Specific Jurisdiction

4. General vs. Specific Jurisdiction

In this lesson, you will learn the differences between courts of general and specific jurisdiction, and each will be broken down individually. Upon completion of this lesson, you should have a better understanding of both types of jurisdiction.

Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

5. Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

Courts exercise two types of jurisdiction over cases: original jurisdiction and appellate jurisdiction for cases previously heard in a lower court. Judges have the option, when hearing an appeals case, to reverse or remand a decision based on a violation of law like abuse of discretion.

Federal Question Jurisdiction: Definition & Examples

6. Federal Question Jurisdiction: Definition & Examples

Federal question jurisdiction is the authority of a federal trial court to hear cases involving two parties who have a controversy involving federal law or the U.S. Constitution. In this lesson we will explain what that means and provide everyday examples.

Supplemental Jurisdiction: Statute & Examples

7. Supplemental Jurisdiction: Statute & Examples

Federal courts' jurisdiction over disputes that arise between state citizens is limited by the U.S. Constitution and federal statutes. Supplemental jurisdiction expands those limits, and in this lesson, we will explore just how that works.

Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: Definition & International Law

8. Extraterritorial Jurisdiction: Definition & International Law

The legal and territorial boundaries of a nation usually are fairly well defined; however, extraterritorial jurisdiction allows those boundaries to extend in certain circumstances. In this lesson, we'll look at the definition of extraterritorial jurisdiction and how it applies to international law.

Jurisdiction over Property: Definition & Types

9. Jurisdiction over Property: Definition & Types

In rem and quasi in rem jurisdiction give a court power over property. The court's power over the property can be used as leverage or as a means of satisfying a civil action against a defendant. The conditions that are required determine the court's ability to exercise both types of jurisdiction of property.

What is the Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court?

10. What is the Jurisdiction of the Supreme Court?

The U.S. Supreme Court exercises a right to preside over specific cases and is considered the court of original jurisdiction based on subject-matter jurisdiction. It is considered an appellate court for cases involving constitutional law under certain circumstances.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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