Ch 6: Understanding Unemployment: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Understanding Unemployment unit of this AP Macroeconomics Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about the theories and principles related to the issue of unemployment. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our AP Macroeconomics Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to understand the concept of unemployment and its complexities. There is no faster or easier way to learn about unemployment. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about rational expectations, the labor force and the three main types of unemployment.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need an economics curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and an understanding unemployment unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Understanding Unemployment Unit Objectives:

  • Explain the methods by which unemployment is measured.
  • Discuss the reasons for changes to the unemployment rate.
  • Describe cyclical, frictional and structural unemployment.
  • Learn about the natural rate of unemployment and the classical theory of unemployment.
  • Explain the theory of rational expectations and its effects.
  • Examine the significance of the minimum wage and the ways in which it affects the labor market.

6 Lessons in Chapter 6: Understanding Unemployment: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Defining and Measuring the Unemployment Rate

1. Defining and Measuring the Unemployment Rate

You've probably heard about the unemployment rate, especially given how high it was in the 2008 recession. Find out how economists define unemployment, what the unemployment rate is, and how to calculate it in this lesson.

Why the Unemployment Rate Decreases and Increases

2. Why the Unemployment Rate Decreases and Increases

Policymakers, investors, and consumers watch the monthly unemployment rate with great interest. In this lesson, you'll learn what factors influence the unemployment rate and why the rate can change rapidly from month to month.

Three Types of Unemployment: Cyclical, Frictional & Structural

3. Three Types of Unemployment: Cyclical, Frictional & Structural

If you've ever lost your job after the holiday season, you've experienced at least one type of unemployment. In this lesson, explore the three types of unemployment including cyclical, frictional, and structural using real-world examples.

Natural Rate of Unemployment: Definition and Formula

4. Natural Rate of Unemployment: Definition and Formula

Explore the natural level of employment through the eyes of the Classical School and Keynesian economics, including fiscal policies that may reduce it.

Rational Expectations in the Economy and Unemployment

5. Rational Expectations in the Economy and Unemployment

This lesson provides an overview of the theory of rational expectations and then applies it to the labor market, fiscal policy and monetary policy. In the lesson, you'll learn more about expectations and outcomes in a world where people want to maximize profit.

Minimum Wage and its Effects on Employment

6. Minimum Wage and its Effects on Employment

There are times when the labor market is perfectly balanced between what employers are willing to pay and what workers want in a job. In this lesson, find out what happens to the labor market when governments intervene, imposing a minimum wage.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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