Ch 3: United States Constitution & Bill of Rights

About This Chapter

Study this chapter to further your understanding of the United States Constitution and Bill of Rights. These lessons will help strengthen your knowledge surrounding early American government.

United States Constitution & Bill of Rights - Chapter Summary

These comprehensive and engaging history lessons will help you review the most important information related to the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. The chapter helps you contextualize the beginnings of America's political system after the Revolutionary War. You'll also review the contents of the Constitution's preamble, articles and amendments. After completing the lessons in this chapter, you'll be able to:

  • Assess the social and economic impact of the American Revolution
  • Explain the Northwest Ordinance and Shay's Rebellion
  • Analyze the Articles of Confederation and recognize its weaknesses
  • Describe the Constitutional Convention
  • Summarize the preamble, articles and amendments of the U.S. Constitution
  • Understand the Bill of Rights
  • Discuss George Washington and the new United States Government

This collection of history lessons is a convenient and effective resource for reviewing concepts surrounding the U.S. Constitution. Our expert instructors break down the political climate of the time and help you summarize key components to America's early government documents. To help ensure you take away the most important information from these lessons, you can take our interactive self-assessment quizzes that follow each lesson. Printable lesson transcripts are available to help you review key terms. You can study the chapter material at any time and access it on any computer or mobile device.

7 Lessons in Chapter 3: United States Constitution & Bill of Rights
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

1. American Revolution: Social and Economic Impact

Learn about the impact of the Revolutionary War throughout the world, especially on various segments of American society. We'll look at political, social, and economic impacts.

The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

2. The Articles of Confederation and the Northwest Ordinance

The Articles of Confederation was the new nation's founding document, but the government established under the Articles was too weak. The new central government had no way of raising revenue and no ability to enforce the commitments made by the states. The Northwest Ordinance paved the way for the growth of the new nation.

Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

3. Weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and Shays Rebellion

The Articles of Confederation were too weak to create an effective government for the new nation. In this lesson, discover how Shays' Rebellion proved that the national government needed to strengthen.

The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

4. The Constitutional Convention: The Great Compromise

The Constitutional Convention was intended to amend the Articles of Confederation. Instead, those in attendance set out to found a republic (the likes of which had never been seen), which is still going strong well over 200 years later. To accomplish this task, compromises had to be made. The Great Compromise designed the bicameral congress the U.S. has today.

The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

5. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

6. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

George Washington and the New United States Government

7. George Washington and the New United States Government

George Washington was the United States' first president. He knew everything he did would set the stage for future presidents of the country. A heavy weight was on his shoulders, and much of what he established in his two terms set the precedent for presidents today.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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