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Ch 4: U.S. Constitutional Principles & Law

About This Chapter

This self-paced chapter is filled with engaging video lessons you can watch any time to boost your knowledge of U.S. constitutional principles and law. Take short quizzes and a practice exam to check your comprehension and enhance your ability to excel on a test or earn course credit.

U.S. Constitutional Principles & Law - Chapter Summary

Feel confident in your understanding of U.S. constitutional principles and law by exploring this chapter's fun lessons. Our instructors offer in-depth analyses of the Bill of Rights, the First Amendment, federalism, the Supremacy Clause and more. Each lesson in this chapter is available as a short video or full transcript, enabling you to examine these concepts in a format that suits your study preferences. The lessons come with short quizzes designed to test your understanding of the concepts they cover. Any questions that arise while exploring the lessons can be submitted to our experts. Once you've completed this chapter, you will be able to:

  • Describe the Preamble, articles and amendments of the U.S. Constitution
  • Define and discuss the principle of the rule of law
  • Explain rights involving search and seizure addressed in the Fourth Amendment
  • Discuss the basics of due process and the right to take the Fifth Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment
  • Provide details about the equal protection clause in the Fifth Amendment and Fourteenth Amendment
  • Exhibit knowledge of the Ninth Amendment and rights retained by the people
  • Share details about the judicial review of Marbury v. Madison
  • Outline provisions for treaties under Article II of the U.S. Constitution

11 Lessons in Chapter 4: U.S. Constitutional Principles & Law
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

1. The US Constitution: Preamble, Articles and Amendments

The U.S. Constitution is one of the most important documents in history. It establishes the government of the United States, and its first ten amendments, the Bill of Rights, assures every U.S. citizen the rights we have all come to hold dear.

The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

2. The Bill of Rights: The Constitution's First 10 Amendments

The Bill of Rights was pivotal in getting the U.S. Constitution ratified. More importantly, the Bill of Rights guarantees the rights of every citizen of the United States in a way that is nearly unequaled.

Federalism & the Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

3. Federalism & the Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

The United States is a federalist government, where the citizens are subject to the powers of several governmental units. Our United States Constitution tells us that the federal government is the highest, or supreme, governmental power. This lesson explores the concept of federalism and the supremacy clause.

What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

4. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

5. The First Amendment: Commercial Speech, Scrutiny & Restrictions

The First Amendment of the Constitution states that all citizens are free to practice their preferred religion, speak freely and to assemble. Learn how and why businesses are less protected and are held to a higher scrutiny in this lesson.

The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

6. The Fourth Amendment: Search & Seizure

One of our rights according to the Bill of Rights and the U.S. Constitution is the Fourth Amendment, and it protects citizens from illegal search and seizure of person or property with proper warrants stating probable cause.

Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

7. Due Process & Taking the Fifth & Fourteenth Amendments

There are only two amendments that stand for the same rights: the 5th Amendment and 14th Amendment. In this lesson, we will learn how both amendments speak to the rights of life, liberty and property with government protection and due process.

The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

8. The Equal Protection Clause in the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments

Both the 5th Amendment and the 14th Amendment of the US Constitution provide all citizens with equal protection of their right to life, liberty and property. The main difference being the 5th Amendment provides it under the Due Process clause.

Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

9. Ninth Amendment: Rights Retained by People

The purpose of the Ninth Amendment is to protect the citizens' rights that aren't necessarily mentioned elsewhere in the Constitution, like the right to privacy or the right to marry. It also prevents the violation of those rights by the government.

U.S. Constitution: Definition and the Judicial Review of Marbury v. Madison

10. U.S. Constitution: Definition and the Judicial Review of Marbury v. Madison

Our United States Constitution is known as the 'Supreme Law of the Land.' The United States Supreme Court determines when other laws are in conflict with the Constitution. This lesson explains the concepts of supremacy and judicial review.

Treaties Under Article II of the U.S. Constitution

11. Treaties Under Article II of the U.S. Constitution

Treaties are an important part of international law. A treaty is a legally binding agreement made between two or more government entities. This lesson explains the difference between bilateral and multilateral treaties.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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