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Ch 8: U.S. History (1791 to 1877)

About This Chapter

Our engaging chapter provides an outline of U.S. history from 1791 to 1877 you can review on any smartphone, computer or tablet 24 hours a day. Preparing for an important certification exam is a snap when you have the video lessons and quizzes in this chapter to help you study.

U.S. History (1791 to 1877) - Chapter Summary

Professional instructors created this chapter on U.S. history from 1791 to 1877, ensuring you're reviewing accurate information provided in a helpful way when you access this chapter. Just a few of the topics covered in these video lessons include the presidential election of 1800 and the role and position of John Marshall's Supreme Court during the Virginia dynasty. Once you watch these videos, you should be ready to complete these objectives:

  • Detail the conflict between Andrew Jackson and the Whig party
  • Outline 19th century reform movements
  • Identify important figures in the abolitionist movement
  • Discuss Lincoln's election, the new Confederacy and Southern secession
  • Explain the role of the Battle of Fort Sumter in the start of the Civil War
  • Describe Vicksburg, Gettysburg and Chancellorsville as turning points in the Civil War
  • Detail General Grant's march towards Richmond and the end of the war
  • Define the successes and failures of the Reconstruction period

These video lessons feature video tabs that make them easy to navigate and review as many times as needed. The lesson quizzes and comprehensive chapter test found here help you ensure you're prepared for exam day. Printing out our lesson transcripts is a handy way to make offline study guides you can use any time to review key concepts and dates.

11 Lessons in Chapter 8: U.S. History (1791 to 1877)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Presidential Election of 1800: Candidates, Summary & Significance

1. Presidential Election of 1800: Candidates, Summary & Significance

In this lesson, you'll learn about the candidates who ran for president in 1800, the issues that divided them, the historical significance of the election, and why this election was termed the 'Revolution of 1800.'

John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

2. John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

Think old Supreme Court cases don't relate to your life today? Under the leadership of Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court made many landmark decisions that shaped the American judicial system - including the rights of citizens - and affect the most important cases in the country to this day.

Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

3. Andrew Jackson vs. the Whig Party: Rise of Executive Power

In this lesson, we will discuss how Andrew Jackson's administration strengthened executive power as well as the rise of the Whig Party in opposition to Jackson and his policies.

Reform Movements of the 19th Century

4. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

5. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

6. Lincoln's Election, Southern Secession & the New Confederacy

Learn about how Abraham Lincoln's election in the contentious 1860 presidential race set off a domino effect leading to the secession of South Carolina and six other states and the formation of the Confederate States of America.

The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

7. The Battle of Fort Sumter & the Start of the Civil War

South Carolina's attack on a U.S. military outpost triggered the American Civil War. Learn more about the Battle of Fort Sumter and the consequences of the fort's surrender to the Confederacy.

Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

8. Civil War Turning Points: Chancellorsville, Gettysburg and Vicksburg

In 1863, three events proved to be turning points for the American Civil War: the Battle of Chancellorsville, the Battle of Gettysburg and the Siege of Vicksburg. Learn about these Civil War turning points in this lesson.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

9. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

10. Reconstruction Period: Goals, Success and Failures

Reconstruction of the South following the American Civil War lasted from 1865-1877 under three presidents. It wasn't welcomed by Southerners, and there were many problems throughout this process. But, was it successful?

American Civil War: Facts, Causes & Effects

11. American Civil War: Facts, Causes & Effects

In this lesson, we will examine the American Civil War. We will explore the causes leading to the outbreak of war, examine key battles and developments, and analyze the impact of this horrible war.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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