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Ch 14: U.S. History (1801-1865)

About This Chapter

Study U.S. history from 1801 to 1865. Discover how the nation was shaped and the influential people who formed this democracy. Make studying easier - watch video lessons and take self-assessment quizzes.

U.S. History (1801-1865) - Chapter Summary

With the following online lessons, you can refresh your recollection of U.S. history and add to your knowledge of U.S. history from the early to mid-19th century. Video instructors guide you through all the key events, important figures, and the vocabulary to make each lesson easy to understand and remember.

Learn about the presidents who governed during this period and their accomplishments, such as James Monroe's Monroe Doctrine, Henry Clay's Missouri Compromise, and Abraham Lincoln's fight to abolish slavery and unite the nation. Discover the age of expansion as explorers conquered new territory and migrated west along the Oregon Trail. Understand the causes, reasons and battles of the Civil War and the key players during that time. Other lessons in this chapter include:

  • Barbary pirates, Napoleonic Wars, and the embargo of 1807
  • President Madison and the War of 1812
  • John Marshall's Supreme Court during the Virginia Dynasty
  • Economic expansion in the 1800s: slavery, immigration, and corporations
  • American industrialization and the birth of public education
  • President Andrew Jackson and the age of the common man
  • The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830
  • Reform movements of the 19th Century
  • The transportation revolution: turnpikes to steamboats to railroads
  • Abolitionist movement: important figures in the fight to end slavery
  • The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, and the Wilmot Proviso

The video lessons in this chapter capture history in bit-sized chunks, making the information easier to follow and retain. Our expert instructors teach you in an engaging and entertaining manner, and each lesson is accompanied by a short quiz to help you gauge your comprehension of the material.

19 Lessons in Chapter 14: U.S. History (1801-1865)
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Barbary Pirates, Napoleonic Wars and Embargo of 1807

1. Barbary Pirates, Napoleonic Wars and Embargo of 1807

Throughout President Jefferson's two terms in office, his foreign policy revolved around war in Europe. Despite his attempts to remain neutral, American ships were drawn into conflict that demanded the president's response.

President Madison and the War of 1812

2. President Madison and the War of 1812

Though often overlooked in the annals of American history, the War of 1812 was really a landmark event for a young nation finding its footing amidst a global power struggle. Watch our lesson to follow President James Madison and the War of 1812 into the inky shadows of history.

James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

3. James Monroe's Presidency: The Monroe Doctrine

Can you imagine a time when there was only one political party in the United States? Find out why James Monroe was one of the nation's most popular presidents during his lifetime and learn about his foreign policy that endured for nearly a century.

John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

4. John Marshall's Supreme Court During the Virginia Dynasty

Think old Supreme Court cases don't relate to your life today? Under the leadership of Chief Justice John Marshall, the Supreme Court made many landmark decisions that shaped the American judicial system - including the rights of citizens - and affect the most important cases in the country to this day.

Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

5. Economic Expansion in the 1800s: Slavery, Immigration & Corporations

Find out how and why America's population grew tremendously in the first part of the 1800s. Then, learn how America became a market economy and added new transportation routes.

American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

6. American Industrialization: Factory System and Market Revolution

New agricultural technology revolutionized the North, South and West. In this lesson, learn how that technology ushered in the Market Revolution in America.

Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

7. Education in Early America: Birth of Public Schools and Universities

During the early and mid-1800s, education reformers pushed to establish free public schools throughout the U.S. Their efforts also led to the establishment of American universities and the first generation of American writers.

Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

8. Henry Clay and the Missouri Compromise of 1820

In 1819, Missouri applied for statehood, threatening to tip the balance of senatorial power in favor of the slave states. Find out how Henry Clay resolved the matter for the next 30 years.

President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

9. President Andrew Jackson and the Age of the Common Man

In this lesson, we will explore the dirty politics of the 1828 election and the Age of the Common Man in American politics. Discover how this election changed American politics forever.

Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

10. Regional Conflict in America: Debate Over States' Rights

In this lesson, we will explore sectional tensions that emerged between the West, North, and South over land and tariffs, leading to confrontations in the Senate and a second nullification crisis.

The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

11. The Trail of Tears and Jackson's Indian Removal Act of 1830

In this lesson, we'll discuss Jackson's forced removal of Native Americans from their land in the east to new territory west of the Mississippi River.

Reform Movements of the 19th Century

12. Reform Movements of the 19th Century

Inspired by the Second Great Awakening and Transcendentalism, Americans started a number of social reform movements in the antebellum era, including the fight against alcohol and slavery, as well as the fight for public schools, humane prisons and asylums, and women's rights.

The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

13. The Transportation Revolution: Turnpikes to Steamboats to Railroads

In the half-century before the Civil War, America experienced a transportation revolution that improved the way people and goods crossed the nation, opened up new areas for settlement and altered the centers of economic power.

Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

14. Abolitionist Movement: Important Figures in the Fight to End Slavery

The abolitionist movement spanned decades. Although slavery did not end peacefully, great Americans like William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, and Harriet Beecher Stowe were some of the driving forces behind the anti-slavery movement.

The Oregon Trail: Westward Migration to the Pacific Ocean

15. The Oregon Trail: Westward Migration to the Pacific Ocean

Throughout the first half of the 19th century, the United States expanded its borders all the way to the Pacific Ocean, fulfilling its manifest destiny. Find out about the reasons people wanted this land, the path that took them there and the politicians who supported it all.

The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

16. The Mexican-American War, Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo & the Wilmot Proviso

The controversial Mexican-American War lasted from 1846-1848. In this lesson, discover how the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo expanded the southern part of the United States all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

17. Civil War Begins: Northern and Southern Advantages Compared

At the outbreak of the American Civil War, both the North and South believed the conflict would be over quickly. But advantages for both the Confederacy and the Union meant a prolonged war between the states. In this lesson, discover some of the advantages that the North and South had.

End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

18. End of the Civil War: General Grant Begins the March Toward Richmond

President Lincoln took a gamble and named Ulysses S. Grant as General-in-Chief of the Union army. They devised a plan to finally take Richmond and win the war in 1864. In this lesson, learn about General Grant's controversial tactics.

Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

19. Lincoln's Assassination and Lee's Surrender at Appomattox Courthouse

Two of the most eventful weeks in American history took place between April 1 and April 15, 1865, during which Richmond (the capital of the Confederacy) fell, General Lee surrendered at Appomattox Courthouse and President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
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