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Ch 16: US Jurisprudence - MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy

About This Chapter

Different areas of the law fall into various areas of jurisdiction. This chapter of the MTEL Political Science course examines types of law and uses quizzes and transcripts to help you get ready to take the MTEL exam.

MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy: US Jurisprudence - Chapter Summary

The American legal system has a multitude of layers that can be studied at many different levels. These video lessons in the MTEL Political Science review course will provide you with a fun and easy-to-follow study guide for you to use on your way to taking the MTEL exam. As you examine the American legal system, you will also be studying the following subjects:

  • Principle of the rule of law
  • Interpreting the Constitution
  • Public and private law
  • Substantive and procedural law
  • Original and appellate jurisdiction
  • Federal, state and concurrent jurisdiction
  • Determining the venue for a court case

These video lessons include a timeline feature directly below the video presentation, eliminating the need to watch from start to finish, and enabling you to take each lesson at your own pace. If you have any additional questions about the U.S. legal system, you can ask one of the experts available at Study.com by utilizing the feature located in your dashboard.

US Jurisprudence - MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy Chapter Objectives

The MTEL Political Science exam is the test taken by all teachers in the state of Massachusetts who are looking to earn their certification. Questions on the justice system will appear on the U.S. Government and Civics subarea, which accounts for 20 percent of the exam. This section, like the rest of the exam, is entirely in multiple-choice format.

8 Lessons in Chapter 16: US Jurisprudence - MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Sources of Law in the American Legal System

1. Sources of Law in the American Legal System

The rules that govern society come from a number of places. This lesson will cover the sources of law in the American legal system. A short quiz will follow the lesson to check your understanding.

What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

2. What Is the Rule of Law? - Definition & Principle

Rule of law takes on several meanings. On one hand, it means that no person or government is above the law. In another, it means that no government or its officials can enforce laws that are unfair or unjust.

Approaches to Constitutional Interpretation

3. Approaches to Constitutional Interpretation

The United States Constitution was written in 1787, but a thing or two has changed since then! This creates a potential problem: How do words written over 200 years ago apply to today's issues? In this lesson, we'll discuss some common approaches to interpreting the Constitution.

Public Law vs. Private Law: Definitions and Differences

4. Public Law vs. Private Law: Definitions and Differences

The simple difference between public and private law is in those that each affects. Public law affects society as a whole, while private law affects individuals, families, businesses and small groups.

Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

5. Substantive Law vs. Procedural Law: Definitions and Differences

Substantive law and procedural law work together to ensure that in a criminal or civil case, the appropriate laws are applied and the proper procedures are followed to bring a case to trial. In this lesson, we'll discuss the differences between the two and how they relate to the legal system as a whole.

Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

6. Court Functions: Original and Appellate Jurisdiction

Courts exercise two types of jurisdiction over cases: original jurisdiction and appellate jurisdiction for cases previously heard in a lower court. Judges have the option, when hearing an appeals case, to reverse or remand a decision based on a violation of law like abuse of discretion.

Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

7. Subject Matter Jurisdiction: Federal, State and Concurrent

One of the ways a court determines whether a case will be heard is based on subject matter jurisdiction. We will explore several factors that determine subject matter jurisdiction in state and federal courts, including concurrent subject matter jurisdiction.

How Venue is Determined for a Court Case

8. How Venue is Determined for a Court Case

Venue is the location where a civil or criminal case is decided. The venue is decided similarly in civil and criminal trials. However, the venue is decided differently in state and federal courts.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the MTEL Political Science/Political Philosophy (48): Practice & Study Guide course

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