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Ch 1: Using Evidence to Support Analysis: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1

About This Chapter

Help your high school juniors and seniors meet Common Core literacy standards for this grade level. The video lessons and quizzes included in this chapter are designed to supplement classroom instruction on topics like primary and secondary source materials, the use of supporting details, and the parts of an argument.

Standard: Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources, connecting insights gained from specific details to an understanding of the text as a whole. (CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1)

About This Chapter

Students who master this standard should be able to evaluate source material, identify the parts of an argument, and select the appropriate supporting details to back up their analysis of a written text. Help your students meet these goals with video lessons that can show them how to:

  • Distinguish between primary and secondary sources
  • Understand the processes involved in historical interpretation
  • Identify the uses of supporting details in essay writing
  • Apply methods for evaluating source materials
  • Pinpoint an argument's claims, counterclaims and reasoning
  • Select appropriate criteria and evidence for an evaluative essay
  • Follow the steps involved in making inferences
  • Use details to support an argument

Students who reach this benchmark have the reading comprehension and critical thinking skills needed to analyze any type of informational text. They're also prepared to learn how these materials can be used to support arguments presented in their own writing.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Listed below are a few suggestions for using the lessons and quizzes to help your students meet this Common Core literacy standard:

Quiz Students on Source Materials

Watch the videos on primary and secondary sources. Present students with sample texts and facilitate a class discussion to determine which ones are primary texts and which ones are secondary texts.

Lead a Group Activity

After students watch video lessons on the parts of an argument, break them up into teams. Assign each group one of the historical texts you've been discussing in class and ask them to identify their text's main point, reasoning, and supporting details.

Assign Lessons for Homework

Have students write an evaluative essay for homework. Send them links to corresponding video lessons so they'll have quick and easy access to pointers for writing this type of essay. Assign the quizzes to see which areas, if any, they're struggling with.

8 Lessons in Chapter 1: Using Evidence to Support Analysis: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.1
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is a Primary Source? - Definition & Examples

1. What is a Primary Source? - Definition & Examples

Let's explore primary sources. In this lesson, learn about first hand materials as primary sources. And then, begin to analyze and determine if a document, information, or object is a primary source.

Historical Methodology: Evidence and Interpretation

2. Historical Methodology: Evidence and Interpretation

In this lesson. we will learn about historical methodology. We will learn how history is constructed based on evidence and how various interpretations are formulated.

Secondary Source: Definition & Examples

3. Secondary Source: Definition & Examples

What are secondary sources? Read this lesson to learn about these materials. You'll also find out how to determine whether or not a source is secondary.

How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

4. How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

When writing an essay, you will often be asked to utilize appropriate sources for evidence, including facts and definitions. In this video, we will talk about the ways we can utilize and evaluate sources and evidence.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

5. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

Evaluative Essay: Examples, Format & Characteristics

6. Evaluative Essay: Examples, Format & Characteristics

A good evaluative essay helps a writer present an opinion using criteria and evidence. Learn all about the evaluative essay and its components in this lesson.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

7. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

Using Details to Support an Argument

8. Using Details to Support an Argument

This lesson will help you to be prepared to make a more comprehensive argument by including details. You'll consider what's missing from arguments without specifics and what strategies to use to improve your supporting information.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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