Ch 19: WEST Middle Level Humanities: Government Purpose & Function

About This Chapter

As you study for the WEST Middle Level Humanities exam, use the activities in this chapter to refresh your understanding of the functions, types, branches and powers of government.

WEST Middle Level Humanities: Government Purpose & Function - Chapter Summary

This chapter was assembled to aid in your review of the functions of government as well as the bodies and documents that fulfill those functions for the United States and the state of Washington. In addition to these topics, the lessons of this chapter also discuss other types of government and foreign policy. These lessons are taught by our professional instructors so that you have an effective way of preparing for questions on the Washington Educator Skills Test - Endorsements (WEST-E) Middle Level Humanities exam about:

  • Functions and types of government
  • Constitutional law
  • Executive, legislative and judicial branches of government
  • Federalism and the supremacy clause
  • Local, state and federal ordinances
  • Three branches of the Washington state government
  • Powers of the president, congress, and courts
  • Tools and powers of foreign policy

Take advantage of the versatility of these lessons by watching them on your mobile device when you are not at your computer. As you finish these lessons, test your understanding of them with the lesson quizzes. With the results from these assessments, find out what topics you don't understand, and then return to the lessons via video tags or the lesson transcripts to fortify your mastery over these subjects.

WEST Middle Level Humanities: Government Purpose & Function Chapter Objectives

The WEST-E Middle Level Humanities is a computer-based exam taken by future middle grades educators seeking certification to teach the humanities in Washington State. This exam is composed of two subtests, each made up of 55 multiple-choice questions, that can be taken in a single 2.5-hour testing session or two 1.25-hour testing sessions. The second subtest covers social studies concepts and 34% of the questions on this test belongs to the domain of Civics and Economics; this section may include some questions on the purpose and structures of government. Use this chapter to help you review the functions and structures of the U.S. and Washington state governments as you prepare for related questions in this domain.

12 Lessons in Chapter 19: WEST Middle Level Humanities: Government Purpose & Function
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Government? - Definition, Role & Functions

1. What is Government? - Definition, Role & Functions

In this lesson, we will examine the various definitions of government. Then we will take a close look at the functions of the U.S. government and the role it plays in citizens' everyday lives.

Traditional Types of Government: Definitions, Strengths & Weaknesses

2. Traditional Types of Government: Definitions, Strengths & Weaknesses

In this lesson, we will explore several traditional types of government. We will define each type and take a close look at its strengths and weaknesses.

What Is Constitutional Law? - Definition & Example

3. What Is Constitutional Law? - Definition & Example

Constitutional law deals with the understanding and use of the United States Constitution. This lesson will define and discuss constitutional law, while examining several famous constitutional law cases.

The 3 Branches of Government: Executive, Legislative, Judicial

4. The 3 Branches of Government: Executive, Legislative, Judicial

In 1787, leaders from each of the states gathered to write the United States Constitution. The Constitution sets out how our nation is governed and creates a system that separates powers between different branches. This lesson explores the three branches of our federal government.

Federalism & the Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

5. Federalism & the Supremacy Clause: Definition & Example

The United States is a federalist government, where the citizens are subject to the powers of several governmental units. Our United States Constitution tells us that the federal government is the highest, or supreme, governmental power. This lesson explores the concept of federalism and the supremacy clause.

Local, State & Federal Ordinances: Definitions and Differences

6. Local, State & Federal Ordinances: Definitions and Differences

In the United States, people are subject to the powers of several governmental units. Citizens must comply with federal, state and local laws - all at the same time. This lesson explores the definitions and differences between federal, state and local laws.

The 3 Branches of Washington State Government

7. The 3 Branches of Washington State Government

The federal government can't run everything -- not in a country of 320 million people. Learn about the government of Washington State and its three branches: executive, legislative, and judicial.

Presidential Powers: Major Types & Examples

8. Presidential Powers: Major Types & Examples

Our United States Constitution established three branches of government, including an executive branch headed by the U.S. president. This lesson discusses the powers and roles of the president.

What is Congress? - Definition, Powers & Structure

9. What is Congress? - Definition, Powers & Structure

In this lesson, we will review what the United States Congress is. We will take a closer look at the makeup of Congress, what its powers are and what it represents.

The Power of the Federal Judiciary: Sources & Consequences

10. The Power of the Federal Judiciary: Sources & Consequences

Federal judges and Supreme Court justices make their decisions using different rationales and theories. This lesson explores the power of the federal judiciary, including a discussion of judicial review and judicial activism.

Tools of Foreign Policy

11. Tools of Foreign Policy

This lesson will explain some of the different tools used in foreign policy. It will focus on diplomacy, sanctions, containment, collective security, deterrence, and military force.

Foreign Policy Powers of the President & Congress

12. Foreign Policy Powers of the President & Congress

In the United States, both the president and Congress have influence over the development and implementation of foreign policy. In this lesson, you'll learn about the powers that the executive and legislative branch exerts over foreign policy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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Other Chapters

Other chapters within the WEST Middle Level Humanities (Subtests 1 & 2)(052/053): Practice & Study Guide course

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