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Ch 13: Westward Expansion, Industrialization & Urbanization (1870-1900) - US History: Homeschool Curriculum

About This Chapter

The Westward Expansion, Industrialization and Urbanization (1870-1900) unit of this U.S. History Homeschool course is designed to help homeschooled students learn about the goals, movements and economic policies of 1870 to 1900. Parents can use the short videos to introduce topics, break up lessons and keep students engaged.

Who's it for?

This unit of our U.S. History Homeschool course will benefit any student who is trying to learn about America's growth during the late 1800s. There is no faster or easier way to learn about U.S. history. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who require an efficient, self-paced course of study to learn about the politics and reform movements of the Industrial Revolution era.
  • Homeschool parents looking to spend less time preparing lessons and more time teaching.
  • Homeschool parents who need a U.S. history curriculum that appeals to multiple learning types (visual or auditory).
  • Gifted students and students with learning differences.

How it works:

  • Students watch a short, fun video lesson that covers a specific unit topic.
  • Students and parents can refer to the video transcripts to reinforce learning.
  • Short quizzes and a Westward Expansion, Industrialization and Urbanization (1870-1900) unit exam confirm understanding or identify any topics that require review.

Westward Expansion, Industrialization and Urbanization (1870-1900) Unit Objectives:

  • Discuss the Social Gospel Movement.
  • Examine the Homestead Act of 1862.
  • Read about the formation of labor unions.
  • Study the politics of the Industrial Revolution.
  • Read about the history of the transcontinental railroad.
  • Examine economics and conditions for workers during the Second Industrial Revolution.
  • Read about the conflict between Native Americans and the U.S. government.
  • Learn about the contributions of Fredrick Taylor.
  • Explore the effects of urbanization during the Second Industrial Revolution.
  • Read about immigration and the rise of nativism.
  • Examine the platform of the Populist Party.
  • Discuss industrial leader Andrew Carnegie and his business practices.
  • Read about federal and monetary policies during the Second Industrial Revolution.

15 Lessons in Chapter 13: Westward Expansion, Industrialization & Urbanization (1870-1900) - US History: Homeschool Curriculum
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

1. Westward Expansion: The Homestead Act of 1862 & the Frontier Thesis

Between the mid-1800s and the turn of the 20th century, the American frontier opened and closed abruptly. What factors influenced this land rush, and how did it help shape American history?

Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

2. Expanding the Transcontinental Railroad: History and Impact

After decades of wrangling, plans were finalized for construction of a transcontinental railroad during the Civil War. After completion in 1869, the railroad changed many aspects of American life, for better or worse.

Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

3. Native Americans: Conflict, Conquest and Assimilation During the Gilded Age

In the second half of the 19th century, the federal government attempted to control Native American nations. This led to violent conflicts known together as the Indian Wars. Learn about famous battles, and the attempt to 'civilize' tribes through various policies.

Economic Policies During the Second Industrial Revolution

4. Economic Policies During the Second Industrial Revolution

With encouragement from the federal government, the Second Industrial Revolution transformed America from an agrarian nation into an industrial power. The mixed effects of these changes on the American people prompted Mark Twain to dub the period the 'Gilded Age.'

American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

5. American Industry Development in the Gilded Age: Bessemer Process, Scientific Management & New Business Models

American industry was transformed in the Second Industrial Revolution but not just through mechanization. Find out how new methods of management and organization helped the development of big business.

Andrew Carnegie and the Robber Barons

6. Andrew Carnegie and the Robber Barons

The Second Industrial Revolution created enormous wealth for industrialists like Andrew Carnegie. These corporate leaders were sometimes called Robber Barons for their questionable business practices, but they were also well-known for their philanthropy.

Frederick Taylor & Management: Maximizing Productivity & Efficiency

7. Frederick Taylor & Management: Maximizing Productivity & Efficiency

Known as the father of scientific management, Frederick Taylor revolutionized management practices. This lesson will discuss the contributions Taylor made to the field of management, most of which are still used today to maximize productivity and efficiency.

Labor Conditions During the Second Industrial Revolution

8. Labor Conditions During the Second Industrial Revolution

In the period between the Civil War and World War I, the American economy - supported by industry rather than agriculture - boomed. But, not everything glittered in the Gilded Age. Learn about the difficult, dangerous conditions of work during the Second Industrial Revolution.

Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

9. Gilded Age Politics: Political Machines & Civil Service Reform

Refresh your memory of the 'Forgotten Presidents' of the Gilded Age, and learn how Civil Service Reform might have cleaned up the federal government, but not the cities and states. They were the domain of political machines, like Tammany Hall.

Labor Unions During the Second Industrial Revolution: Organized Labor vs. Management

10. Labor Unions During the Second Industrial Revolution: Organized Labor vs. Management

Before American businesses had to comply with basic labor laws and safety regulations, workers organized to improve their working conditions. Learn about the early labor unions and their violent clashes with management and government.

The Grange and the Populist Party Platform: Goals, History & Definitions

11. The Grange and the Populist Party Platform: Goals, History & Definitions

During the Gilded Age of the late 19th century, farm prices fell and the federal government began supporting industry. Farmers first organized the Grange, a social movement that turned political with Farmers' Alliances. The Populist Party emerged to represent agrarian interests at the national level.

Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

12. Immigration in Industrial America and the Rise of Nativism

Between the Civil War and WWI, America experienced a massive third wave of immigration. Learn about where these immigrants came from, where they went and how 'native' Americans responded to them.

Urbanization During the Second Industrial Revolution in America: Effects & Problems

13. Urbanization During the Second Industrial Revolution in America: Effects & Problems

After the Civil War, America transformed from a rural nation to an urban nation. Learn where all those people came from and why. Using New York City as an example, you'll see some of the problems of urbanization and the steps they took to improve it.

The Social Gospel Movement: Definition and Goals of Urban Reform Movements

14. The Social Gospel Movement: Definition and Goals of Urban Reform Movements

Many Americans were desperately poor around the turn of the 20th century. The Social Gospel movement emerged among Protestant Christians to improve the economic, moral and social conditions of the urban working class.

Middle Class Opportunities in American Cities During the Second Industrial Revolution

15. Middle Class Opportunities in American Cities During the Second Industrial Revolution

In the late 1800s, a new middle class emerged in America. In this lesson, learn about new opportunities available to these urbanites, including technology, sports and leisure, education and the arts.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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