Ch 6: Foundations of Reading: Understanding Literary Texts

About This Chapter

Review the concepts related to understanding literary texts as you prepare for the Wisconsin Foundations of Reading exam. These lessons will help you ensure you've ready for test day.

WI Foundations of Reading: Understanding Literary Texts - Chapter Summary

The Wisconsin Foundations of Reading exam may test your knowledge literary texts. Our instructors designed this chapter to help you answer questions that involve:

  • Determine meaning through context clues
  • Text-to-text connections and literal language
  • Inferring meaning and evaluating reasoning
  • Close reading strategies and prior knowledge theories
  • Analyzing evidence in texts
  • Steps for analyzing literature and reading comprehension strategies
  • Literary response skills
  • Teaching reading comprehension
  • Story sequencing, class discussions and reciprocal teaching strategies and activities

These lessons draw special attention to the literary vocabulary words you need to be familiar with. They also include quizzes that assess your level of understanding in this subject.

15 Lessons in Chapter 6: Foundations of Reading: Understanding Literary Texts
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

1. Constructing Meaning with Context Clues, Prior Knowledge & Word Structure

In this lesson, you will learn how readers use prior knowledge, context clues and word structure to aid their understanding of what they read. Explore these strategies through examples from literature and everyday life.

Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

2. Making Text-to-Text Connections Between Written Works

In this lesson, we will discuss connecting different writings to each other by learning about the authors, examining the literary elements, and reflecting on the writings.

Literal Language: Definition & Examples

3. Literal Language: Definition & Examples

Do you sometimes feel like nobody understands you? Well, perhaps you should try using more literal language! Learn more about this form of straightforward expression in this lesson, where you'll also find some literal language in action.

What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

4. What is Inference? - How to Infer Intended Meaning

In this lesson, we will define the terms inference and intended meaning. We will then discuss what steps to take when making inferences in literature.

How to Evaluate Reasoning

5. How to Evaluate Reasoning

Evaluating reasoning in an essay or article is an important step in critical analysis. Being able to judge if something is reasonable whether or not you agree with the argument will be our learning focus for this video.

Close Reading: Strategies & Techniques

6. Close Reading: Strategies & Techniques

In this lesson you will learn what it is to read closely. You will explore strategies and techniques for close reading a text, including highlighting anything that is surprising to you and asking and answering questions about the text.

Prior Knowledge: Definition & Theory

7. Prior Knowledge: Definition & Theory

Have you ever noticed that sometimes it is really easy for you to learn something new but some things are harder to learn? In this lesson, we'll define prior knowledge and why it can make learning new things easier. We'll also explore different strategies to activate prior knowledge.

Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

8. Citing Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

In this lesson, we're going to learn how to analyze a text and cite evidence to support an analysis. We'll also learn the difference between quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, and we'll talk about how to give credit where credit is due.

How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

9. How to Analyze a Literary Passage: A Step-by-Step Guide

In this lesson, we will examine the steps involved in the basic analysis of literature. Then, using a well-known fable, we will go through each step of analysis: comprehension, interpreting and drawing conclusions.

Strategies for Reading Comprehension

10. Strategies for Reading Comprehension

Have you been assigned to read something and you just couldn't understand what the author is trying to tell you? In this lesson, you will learn five strategies to help yourself understand what you are reading.

Story Sequencing: Activities & Games

11. Story Sequencing: Activities & Games

This lesson on story sequencing provides games and activities to be used when teaching students how to put a story in the correct order. Learn how to provide your students with activities to help them retain this reading skill.

Class Discussion: Activities & Ideas

12. Class Discussion: Activities & Ideas

In this lesson, we will discuss the importance of class discussions. We will also review several different types of class discussion activities that are appropriate for a variety of grade levels and subjects.

How to Teach Reading Comprehension

13. How to Teach Reading Comprehension

Teaching reading comprehension requires instilling in the learner the use of several strategies and skills. This lesson will focus on cognitive skills and notation strategies that will enhance reading comprehension.

Developing Literary Response Skills

14. Developing Literary Response Skills

It's often helpful to use a variety of classroom and study approaches to developing reading comprehension and literary response skills. We'll learn about these techniques and discuss examples of writing exercises that increase students' understanding of literary texts.

Reciprocal Teaching: Strategies, Definition & Examples

15. Reciprocal Teaching: Strategies, Definition & Examples

In this lesson, we will define reciprocal teaching as a discussion between teachers and students about reading material and explain the strategies used in the activity.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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