Ch 10: World Literature: Drama Lesson Plans

About This Chapter

The World Literature: Drama chapter of this course is designed to help you plan and teach about the history and different elements of drama in your classroom. The video lessons, quizzes and transcripts can easily be adapted to provide your lesson plans with engaging and dynamic educational content. Make planning your course easier by using our syllabus as a guide.

Weekly Syllabus

Below is a sample breakdown of the World Literature: Drama chapter into a 5-day school week. Based on the pace of your course, you may need to adapt the lesson plan to fit your needs.

Day Topics Key Terms and Concepts Covered
Monday The history and elements of drama Analyze historical periods and explore the following terms: drama, verse drama, prose drama, morality plays, classical drama, modernism, Renaissance theater, realism, plot, staging, literary elements of characters, setting, conflict, dramatic form, and symbolism
Tuesday Comedy, farce, melodrama, and tragedy Identify the elements and differences among these four types of dramas, review how these four types of dramas have changed throughout history, discuss well-known examples of these drama types, (including Oscar Wilde and Geoffrey Chaucer), and define related terms (e.g. tragic comedy, soap opera, black comedy, and reality television)
Wednesday Examining dramatic works Discuss techniques for interpreting drama compared to interpreting poetry or prose; identify how a drama's theme relates to elements of staging, character development, or plot; and, define the following modern drama concepts: dada/surrealism, Theater of Cruelty, epic theater, expressionism, and Theater of the Absurd
Thursday Modern drama concepts continued Examine Brecht's style of epic theater, Artaud's concept of the Theatre of Cruelty, and various interpretations of the Theatre of the Absurd
Friday Famous dramatists and works Analyze Beckett's 'Waiting for Godot' while paying special attention to character development, plot, and the circular style of dialogue; review Eugene O'Neill biography, his impact on other dramatists, and his works; and, compare the contemporary works of Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller

16 Lessons in Chapter 10: World Literature: Drama Lesson Plans
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

1. What is Drama? - Terms, Time Periods and Styles

Drama is a genre of writing that can be performed for theatre, movies, radio, or television programs. Learn about the terms, history, time periods, and styles of dramatic writing.

History of Drama: Dramatic Movements and Time Periods

2. History of Drama: Dramatic Movements and Time Periods

The genesis of theater can be traced back to primitive times and is still popular in society today. Discover the history of theater, its evolution through different cultures and movements, and those who have made a name for themselves through theater.

Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

3. Elements of Drama: Characters, Plot, Setting & Symbolism

A Drama or a play, artistic writing expressed mainly through dialogue, is comprised of four elements: Character, Plot, Setting, and Symbolism. Explore the importance of each element, and the art behind dramatic form.

Tragedy in Drama: Classical to Modern

4. Tragedy in Drama: Classical to Modern

In drama, a tragedy is defined as a story in which the main character, often referred to as the 'tragic hero', experience hardships and suffers. This lesson will dive into the origins of tragedies in drama, the characteristics of such stories, and how tragedies have changed from their classical roots to modern times.

Dramatic Comedy: History and Types

5. Dramatic Comedy: History and Types

A dramatic comedy must contain a main character who, through change, brings about a happy ending. Explore the origin and definition of important terms, different types of comedy, and examples through history.

Dramatic Farce: History, Examples and Playwrights

6. Dramatic Farce: History, Examples and Playwrights

A dramatic farce is a plot or situation meant to entertain audiences by putting the characters in comical or outrageous situations. Learn more about the history of dramatic farce, what characteristics define the genre, and famous examples like 'The Importance of Being Earnest'.

Elements of Melodrama: From Early Theater to the Modern Soap Opera

7. Elements of Melodrama: From Early Theater to the Modern Soap Opera

A melodrama is a story or plot that focuses on the struggle of good versus evil, and eventually leads to the hero defeating the villain. Discover the beginnings of melodramas, what characteristics define the genre, and how this storyline is used in modern media, such as soap operas.

Futurism, Dada, Surrealism & Expressionism

8. Futurism, Dada, Surrealism & Expressionism

Futurism, Dada, Surrealism, and Expressionism were different theater movements that coexisted between 1900 and 1960. Explore comparisons and contrasts between these dramatic movements of the early 1900s.

Epic Theatre: Brecht

9. Epic Theatre: Brecht

Epic theatre was developed by Bertolt Brecht to promote change upon the audience's reflection of the instructional presentation using reason, instead of emotion. Explore the characteristics of Brecht's epic theatre through famous examples.

Theatre of Cruelty: Artaud

10. Theatre of Cruelty: Artaud

Antonin Artaud's Theater of Cruelty attempted to help audiences overcome their fears by asking them to face graphic portrayals of violence. Learn about the theater's historical context of surrealism, explore an overview of the Theater of Cruelty's characteristics, and then read examples of the plays performed there.

Theatre of the Absurd

11. Theatre of the Absurd

Existentialism is the concept that free will and personal choice help individuals find their purpose in life. Learn about the elements and historical context of the Theatre of the Absurd and how Samuel Beckett's 1949 play, 'Waiting for Godot', is considered a foundational example of this genre.

Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

12. Analyzing Dramatic Works: Theme, Character Development & Staging

Dramatic works generally refer to plays, choreography, screenplays, and other art that is intended to be performed. Learn about dramatic works, and explore the elements of analysis for dramatic works, including themes, character development, staging, type of play, plot, and stage directions. Understand how drama differs from prose, and recognize that a theatrical piece can be analyzed as literary art.

Waiting for Godot:  Plot, Characters, and Style

13. Waiting for Godot: Plot, Characters, and Style

''Waiting for Godot'' is a quintessential play from the Theater of the Absurd movement by Samuel Beckett. It is essentially about nothing, but in that same notion, it is also about everything. Learn more about ''Waiting for Godot'' through an analysis of the play's plot, characters, and style.

Eugene O'Neill: Biography and Major Plays

14. Eugene O'Neill: Biography and Major Plays

Eugene O'Neill (1888-1953) was an American playwright who left an unforgettable mark on early 20th century theater. Discover more about his life and major plays including The Emperor Jones, Anna Christie, The Iceman Cometh and Long Day's Journey into Night.

Tennessee Williams: Biography, Works, and Style

15. Tennessee Williams: Biography, Works, and Style

From the 1940s through the 1960s, Tennesse Williams would contribute a number metaphor-rich works like 'A Streetcar Named Desire' to the Southern Gothic genre of literature. Explore the biography, works, and style of Tennessee Williams.

Arthur Miller: Biography and Major Plays

16. Arthur Miller: Biography and Major Plays

Arthur Miller was one of America's greatest playwrights. Learn about Miller's biography and early years, some of his most famous plays, critical success, political activism, and his life and legacy.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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More Exams
There are even more practice exams available in World Literature: Drama Lesson Plans.

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