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Ch 15: World War I: Battles & Diplomacy

About This Chapter

Use this chapter to learn about the major battles and diplomatic efforts of World War I. Determine how well you understand important World War I topics by taking each lesson's self-assessment quiz.

World War I: Battles & Diplomacy - Chapter Summary and Learning Objectives

Known as the Great War, World War I took millions of lives, ravaged countries and changed warfare forever. In this chapter, you'll explore the causes of WWI in addition to learning about the key players, technologies and diplomatic efforts that helped shape the war and its outcome. By studying the lessons, you'll find out about topics such as:

  • Why Europe was a 'powder keg' in the years leading up to WWI
  • What new methods of warfare were used during WWI
  • What the outcomes of major WWI battles were
  • Why America entered the war
  • What the results of the Paris Peace Conference were

VideoObjective
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to WarLearn about the causes of WWI and the impact of Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination.
The Powder Keg of Europe During WWIExamine the political turmoil throughout Europe that contributed to the Great War.
World War I: On Land, at Sea & in the AirDiscover the military strategies and new technologies used during WWI.
Famous Battles of the First World War: Lesson & QuizGet details on the locations, strategies and outcomes of key WWI battles.
Diplomacy of World War One: Secret Agreements & Diplomatic ArrangementsFind out about the diplomatic agreements and treaties developed during WWI.
WWI: America's Entry and Russia's ExitSee what events led Russia to retreat from WWI and caused the U.S. to enter it.
The Peace of Paris: Ending World War IDiscover which global leaders attended the Paris Peace Conference and the provisions of the resulting Treaty of Versailles.

7 Lessons in Chapter 15: World War I: Battles & Diplomacy
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

1. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

The assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand was the tipping point for World War I to begin. Learn the causes that led to the war through the acronym MAIN: Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, and Nationalism.

The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

2. The Powder Keg of Europe During WWI

Europe was considered a 'powder keg' in the years leading up to World War I. Learn what it meant to be a 'powder keg' and the factors that led to this instability, including shifting geopolitical dynamics and entangling alliances. Examine the spark that ignited the 'powder keg' and how it figures in historical debate.

World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

3. World War One: On Land, at Sea & In the Air

World War One was the first war in which mechanized warfare was carried out on a large scale, waged on land, at sea, and in the air. Learn how warfare was conducted with the new technologies that made it possible: in trenches, by airplane, and by submarine.

Famous Battles of the First World War

4. Famous Battles of the First World War

The First World War, which was fought between 1914 and 1918, included several significant battles. Learn about the more famous and major battles, including Tannenberg, Marne, Verdun, Somme, and Ypres. Review how each of these battles affected the war, and recognize the difference between Eastern Front and Western Front battles.

Diplomacy of World War One: Secret Agreements & Diplomatic Arrangements

5. Diplomacy of World War One: Secret Agreements & Diplomatic Arrangements

Diplomatic history is a major part when discussing World War I, beginning with the July Crisis. Learn about the Treaty of London, the Zimmermann telegram, the treaty of both Brest-Litovsk and the Treaty of Versailles, along with the Skyes-Picot Agreement and the Balfour Declaration.

WWI: America's Entry and Russia's Exit

6. WWI: America's Entry and Russia's Exit

World War I was fought between two allied groups, the Triple Entente or Allied Powers and the Triple Alliance. Learn about the circumstances behind America's entry into and Russia's exit from WWI, as well as its effects on the war.

The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

7. The Peace of Paris: Ending World War I

Near the end of World War I, President Woodrow Wilson developed a plan for peace in Europe. Learn about Wilson's 14-point peace plan, the Armistice of Compiegne that ended all hostilities, the results of the Paris Peace Conference, and the Treaty of Versailles, in which Germany accepted responsibility for the damage it had caused by starting the war.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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