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Ch 2: Write Informative Texts: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2

About This Chapter

Read about video lessons aligned with the CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2 standard. Learn how to include these lessons in the classroom by reading about topics covered, lesson outcomes, and tips for incorporating videos into specific teaching sessions.

Standard: Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content (CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2).

About This Chapter

Students who have comprehended the precepts of this standard understand how to organize and express interrelated information on a given topic. They know how to determine the most pertinent information to include in an essay and how to structure it in support of a relevant conclusion.

In these videos, lessons are offered on such topics as:

  • Understanding the structure and nature of an informative paper
  • Strategies for brainstorming
  • Conceiving and distinguishing among main ideas, theses, and topic sentences
  • Using sources and discerning which facts and details to include in an essay
  • Tips for choosing appropriate language and instituting a paper's desired tone

Students show expertise in this core standard when writing papers designed to convey complex information. Using cumulative points and lucid transitions, they employ varied and careful language to establish appropriate tone to make the information they're conveying more accessible to their audience.

How to Use These Lessons in Your Classroom

Below are a few tips for including these lessons in the teaching of the CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2 standard:

Brainstorming Lessons

View the video tutorial on brainstorming techniques in class. Afterward, arrange the class into small groups and assign each one a potential essay subject. Invite each group to brainstorm ideas for individual paper topics, allowing them to (respectfully!) offer feedback and build on each other's suggestions.

Topic Identification and Distillation Lessons

Watch the lesson on main ideas, thesis statements, and topic sentences as a class. Then display several sentences or phrases to the students and ask them to indicate which of those three purposes each one best fulfills. Finally, offer the class a broad essay topic and ask each student individually to identify the main idea, distill a thesis statement, and compose a topic sentence for a paper on that subject.

Diction Lessons

After viewing the lesson on how to write with good diction, show the class a written statement that uses simple, non-specific language. Ask students to offer suggestions about how it could be rewritten to embody different tones (serious, upbeat, frightened, etc.). After repeating this exercise a few times as a class, give students their own copy of a simple, non-descriptive paragraph and ask them to revise it so that it conveys a specified tone.

15 Lessons in Chapter 2: Write Informative Texts: CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.11-12.2
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Informative Essay: Definition, Examples & Structure

1. Informative Essay: Definition, Examples & Structure

There are many ways to inform your reader on a topic, from comparing and contrasting to providing a simple definition. Watch this lesson to learn about informative essays and how they educate readers through different formats.

Descriptive Essay: Definition, Examples & Characteristics

2. Descriptive Essay: Definition, Examples & Characteristics

A descriptive essay allows you to paint a picture for your reader in words. Watch this video to learn more about the techniques and elements that can help you fill the picture with lots of great details.

What Is Brainstorming?

3. What Is Brainstorming?

You may have been told that it's important to brainstorm before writing an essay. This video explains why it's well worth your time to make brainstorming part of your writing routine.

Techniques for Brainstorming Great Ideas

4. Techniques for Brainstorming Great Ideas

Great essays are made up of great ideas. Finding those great ideas is the first critical step on the road to writing a terrific essay. Learn some popular and effective brainstorming techniques that will work whether you have an hour or two weeks to write your paper.

Developing the Essay Topic

5. Developing the Essay Topic

The backbone of any essay is a strong and engaging main idea. Learn how to turn an essay prompt into a well-developed topic by watching this video lesson.

Writing: Main Idea, Thesis Statement & Topic Sentences

6. Writing: Main Idea, Thesis Statement & Topic Sentences

What exactly is your essay about? Writing great thesis statements and topic sentences that align with your main idea will help readers to understand the theme, ideas, and central focus of your essay.

How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

7. How to Write With Good Diction to Develop Style, Tone & Point-of-View

Developing a good writing style starts with developing good diction. You can't craft an essay or story the way you want without being able to choose the right words first. Here's how.

How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

8. How to Use Sources to Write Essays and Evaluate Evidence

When writing an essay, you will often be asked to utilize appropriate sources for evidence, including facts and definitions. In this video, we will talk about the ways we can utilize and evaluate sources and evidence.

How to Use Reference Material in Your Writing

9. How to Use Reference Material in Your Writing

When it comes to writing an essay or a vast array of other academic writing projects, you will often have to refer to the works of others. This video will teach you the skills to use reference materials in your writing.

How Word Choice and Language Sets the Tone of Your Essay

10. How Word Choice and Language Sets the Tone of Your Essay

In this video, we will discuss how word choice sets the tone for your essay. This includes letting the reader know if you are angry, happy or even attempting to refrain from bias. These tools bring your 'voice' into your writing.

What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

11. What is a Metaphor? - Examples, Definition & Types

Metaphors are all around you. They're the bright sparkling lights that turn plain evergreens into Christmas trees. Learn how to spot them, why writers write with them, and how to use them yourself right here.

Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

12. Similes in Literature: Definition and Examples

Explore the simile and how, through comparison, it is used as a shorthand to say many things at once. Learn the difference between similes and metaphors, along with many examples of both.

Using Precise Language & Vocabulary in Informative Texts

13. Using Precise Language & Vocabulary in Informative Texts

Writing informative texts can be difficult because you want to be as clear as possible so that your reader understands what you are trying to say. This lesson discusses how precise language and vocabulary will make your writing clearer.

How to Use Analogies in Writing

14. How to Use Analogies in Writing

Analogies are powerful tools that can help you more clearly explain ideas, especially if your ideas are complex. Read on for a short explanation of how you can use analogies in order to make your writing clearer and stronger!

Using Graphics & Multimedia in Writing Projects

15. Using Graphics & Multimedia in Writing Projects

This lesson explores different ways to integrate graphics and multimedia into writing. Using newspapers as an example, we will look at how a front page photo adds dimension to a headline. Then, we will examine digital storytelling techniques.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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