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Ch 3: Writing Argumentative Research Essays

About This Chapter

The lessons in this chapter are designed to help you strengthen your argumentative essay writing skills. This self-paced study resources can help you improve your writing skills, finish essays and prepare for upcoming English exams.

Writing Argumentative Research Essays - Chapter Summary

The lessons in this English composition study resource cover the basic components of argumentative essays. Through a series of short and informative video lessons, you'll quickly examine the different parts of an argument, as well as proper argument structuring and reasoning concepts. After finishing a lesson, try the accompanying self-assessment quiz to make sure you've fully grasped these writing terms and topics. You can study at any time that fits your schedule and use any computer or mobile device to access the chapter material. After finishing these lessons, you should be able to:

  • Write a strong argumentative essay
  • Identify the four basic parts of an argument
  • Know how to structure your argument based on your audience
  • Support your essay's claims by using evidence and reasoning
  • Finish an essay with an effective conclusion

6 Lessons in Chapter 3: Writing Argumentative Research Essays
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Argumentative Essay Paper: Definition & Examples

1. Argumentative Essay Paper: Definition & Examples

Find out what an argumentative essay is, and learn how to write one. Learn about the differences between the argumentative essay and the persuasive essay.

Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

2. Parts of An Argument: Claims, Counterclaims, Reasons, and Evidence

To effectively write an argument, you need to know the four basic parts. In this lesson, you will learn the definitions of the four basic parts and why you need them in an argument.

Writing for An Audience: How to Structure Your Argument

3. Writing for An Audience: How to Structure Your Argument

The structure of a persuasive essay depends on the audience. In this lesson, we'll explore two common argumentative structures - classical and Rogerian - and when each of them is most effective.

How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

4. How to Support Your Claims in Writing With Reasoning and Evidence

What makes an essay persuasive? How can you convince people that your position is the stronger side? In this lesson, we'll explore reasons and evidence and how to use them in a persuasive essay to convince others to support your side.

Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

5. Concluding Statements: Supporting Your Argument

Many writers spend so much time on the body of their essay that the conclusion seems overwhelming. In this lesson, we'll break down the last paragraph of a persuasive essay and look at what needs to be included.

Required Assignments Reminder

6. Required Assignments Reminder

Sorry for the interruption to your course progress! We wanted to make sure you knew this course has a written assignment requirement in order to be completed. Read on to learn where to find these assignments and how to submit them.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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