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Ch 3: Wuthering Heights Literary Analysis & Themes

About This Chapter

The ''Wuthering Heights'' Literary Analysis & Themes chapter of this ''Wuthering Heights'' Study Guide course is the most efficient way to analyze the themes of Emily Bronte's novel ''Wuthering Heights''. This chapter uses simple and fun lessons that take about five minutes to complete, plus includes lesson quizzes and a chapter exam to ensure you can analyze the novel and understand its themes.

Who's It For?

Anyone who needs help analyzing or understanding the themes of Wuthering Heights will benefit from the lessons in this chapter. There is no faster or easier way to analyze the novel's themes and conflicts. Among those who would benefit are:

  • Students who want to learn a broad topic in a short amount of time
  • Students who are looking for easy ways to identify the most important information on the topic
  • Students who have fallen behind in memorizing the themes of Wuthering Heights
  • Students who prefer multiple ways of learning about literature (visual or auditory)
  • Students who have missed class time and need to catch up
  • Students who have limited time to study for an upcoming exam

How It Works:

  • Complete each lesson in the chapter to review all key topics.
  • Refer to the lesson to reinforce your learning.
  • Test your understanding of each lesson with a short quiz.
  • Complete your review with the Wuthering Heights Literary Analysis & Themes chapter exam.

Why It Works:

  • Study Efficiently: The lessons in this chapter cover only information you need to know.
  • Retain What You Learn: Engaging instruction and real-life examples make topics easy to grasp.
  • Be Ready on Test Day: Take the Wuthering Heights Literary Analysis & Themes chapter exam to make sure you're prepared.
  • Get Extra Support: Ask our subject-matter experts any literature question. They're here to help!
  • Study With Flexibility: View lessons on any web-ready device.

Students Will Review:

This chapter summarizes the material students need to know about Wuthering Heights's literary analysis and themes for a standard literature course. Topics covered include:

  • Major themes from Wuthering Heights, including childhood, nature, love, religion, duality, isolation, gender roles, feminism, marriage and more
  • Evidence of Romanticism in the novel
  • The novel's use of supernatural elements
  • Examples of violence and death
  • Class and social themes in Wuthering Heights
  • Conflicts from the novel

18 Lessons in Chapter 3: Wuthering Heights Literary Analysis & Themes
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Romanticism in Wuthering Heights

1. Romanticism in Wuthering Heights

The Romantic period in literature is generally defined as the late 18th century and the first half of the 19th century. Emily Bronte's only novel, Wuthering Heights, published in 1847, is considered a classic of Romantic literature.

Childhood in Wuthering Heights

2. Childhood in Wuthering Heights

In this lesson, we will explore the representation of childhood in Emily Bronte's 'Wuthering Heights' by examining the context of childhood in Bronte's time and then highlighting the actions and emotions of some children in the novel.

Class & Social Themes in Wuthering Heights

3. Class & Social Themes in Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte's classic novel, ''Wuthering Heights'', exposes the reality of England's class system during the Victorian Era. The novel also provides a direct challenge to this strict class system by showing the tragedy of Heathcliff and Catherine as a direct result of their class differences.

Conflict in Wuthering Heights

4. Conflict in Wuthering Heights

'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte is the story of obsessive love and revenge that is packed with conflicts at every level. In this lesson, we look at some of the major internal and external struggles that the characters face.

Nature in Wuthering Heights

5. Nature in Wuthering Heights

The beautiful but dangerous natural elements in Emily Bronte's ''Wuthering Heights'' cause concern for newcomers, but natives find them comforting. Nature, like some of the characters in the novel, is often depicted as uncultivated and threatening.

Love in Jane Eyre & Wuthering Heights

6. Love in Jane Eyre & Wuthering Heights

Charlotte Bronte's ''Jane Eyre'' and Emily Bronte's ''Wuthering Heights'' have been constantly compared since they were published. Though the two share a lot of similar qualities, they diverge sharply in their portrayal of love.

Destructive Love in Wuthering Heights

7. Destructive Love in Wuthering Heights

In 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte, the characters find themselves unable to understand the meaning of love, but rather engage in a series of destructive, dysfunctional relationships with one another. In this lesson, we will analyze the destructive, obsessive relationships in this novel.

Moral Reconciliation in Wuthering Heights

8. Moral Reconciliation in Wuthering Heights

In ''Wuthering Heights'' by Emily Bronte, Catherine and Heathcliff do not get their happily ever after per se, but they do find moral reconciliation by the end of the story.

Religion in Wuthering Heights

9. Religion in Wuthering Heights

In 'Wuthering Heights', Emily Bronte includes elements of religion, from the traditional to the unconventional. In this lesson, we will examine the religious undertones of this novel.

Isolation in Wuthering Heights: Quotes & Analysis

10. Isolation in Wuthering Heights: Quotes & Analysis

In ''Wuthering Heights'' by Emily Bronte, the characters often feel isolated by those who are supposed to care for them. Other times, the isolation is self-imposed. Let's learn more about isolation in this novel.

Duality in Wuthering Heights

11. Duality in Wuthering Heights

In ''Wuthering Heights'', Emily Bronte uses duality to describe characters and setting. Bronte also uses duality to drive the plot. In this lesson, we will look at some of the dual relationships that are developed in this novel.

Resolution in Wuthering Heights

12. Resolution in Wuthering Heights

Wuthering Heights draws to a close with a death and an impending marriage. Though Cathy and Hareton seem to have gotten what they wanted, people begin to report two ghosts who walk the moors near the manor, together forever.

Fascination with Death in Wuthering Heights

13. Fascination with Death in Wuthering Heights

In 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte, the characters face death often, which results in a type of intrigue with death that colors the novel. In this lesson, we will look at death in 'Wuthering Heights.'

Violence in Wuthering Heights: Examples & Analysis

14. Violence in Wuthering Heights: Examples & Analysis

In ''Wuthering Heights'' by Emily Bronte, the characters that spend time at Wuthering Heights find themselves thinking and acting in increasingly violent ways. In this lesson, we will learn about some examples of violence in the story.

Supernatural Elements in Wuthering Heights

15. Supernatural Elements in Wuthering Heights

In this lesson, we will discuss supernatural elements in the novel 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte. First, we'll review how these elements fit into literary history; then, we'll explore their links to the novel's main characters.

Gender Roles in Wuthering Heights

16. Gender Roles in Wuthering Heights

Emily Bronte's 'Wuthering Heights' challenges the strict gender roles of its time in the character of Catherine, who embodies both masculine and feminine qualities. Other characters such as Edgar also blend feminine and masculine characteristics, while Heathcliff represents pure masculinity.

Feminism & Role of Women in Wuthering Heights

17. Feminism & Role of Women in Wuthering Heights

In this lesson, we explore the role that feminism plays in 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte. Although women's rights were limited during this time period, each of the women in the story finds a way to show strength and independence.

Role of Marriage in Wuthering Heights

18. Role of Marriage in Wuthering Heights

Marriage in the novel 'Wuthering Heights' never comes to any good. However, Young Catherine and Hareton, the last two left standing at the end of the novel, may have hope for the future.

Chapter Practice Exam
Test your knowledge of this chapter with a 30 question practice chapter exam.
Not Taken
Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
Not Taken

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