Ch 27: WWI & The Great Depression

About This Chapter

Get an overview of WWI and the Great Depression with the help of the lessons in this chapter. Chapter resources such as videos, transcripts, and quizzes are all meant to enhance your learning experience and journey.

WWI & The Great Depression - Chapter Summary

These lessons look that the events of WWI and the Great Depression. This was a significant era, so working through this chapter is important for a complete knowledge of American history. After completing the lessons, you'll be prepared to recall the following topics:

  • Causes of WWI
  • How the United States got involved in the war
  • Significance of the Treaty of Versailles
  • Impact of WWI around the world
  • Information about the American economy in the 1920s
  • Contributions to the Wall Street Crash of 1929
  • President Hoover's role in the Great Depression
  • How President Roosevelt helped resolve the Great Depression

You can be confident that you are getting a comprehensive study experience because our expert instructors have designed these lessons with you in mind. The lessons are informative, engaging and easily understandable. After you complete each lesson, make sure you take our lesson quizzes as well. This gives you the opportunity to test your knowledge of the lesson's concepts. You will also get immediate feedback so you are aware of your strengths and weaknesses.

12 Lessons in Chapter 27: WWI & The Great Depression
Test your knowledge with a 30-question chapter practice test
Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

1. Causes of World War I: Factors That Led to War

Although World War I began in Europe, it is important to take a look at World War I in relation to U.S. history as well. The U.S. was greatly affected by the war. In this lesson, we'll take a quick and direct look at the causes that led up the war and the assassination that was the final catalyst.

The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

2. The United States in World War I: Official Position, Isolation & Intervention

The United States' best option was to stay out of World War I. They had nothing to gain from getting involved. So, they tried to stay neutral, but as American interests started to lean toward the Allied Powers, many events happened to give the States the final push to enter the war.

American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

3. American Involvement in World War I: How the War Changed After America's Entry

As much as the U.S. wanted to stay neutral during World War I, it proved impossible. This meant the U.S. had to raise the forces and money to wage war. Find out how Americans played their part in WWI in this lesson.

End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

4. End of WWI: the Treaty of Versailles & the League of Nations

In this lesson, we will examine the Treaty of Versailles. We will explore the treaty's negotiations at the Paris Peace Conference, take a look at the treaty's terms, and discuss Germany's reaction to the treaty.

Consequences of World War I Around the World

5. Consequences of World War I Around the World

In this lesson we will examine the consequences of World War I. We will highlight the key developments following the war, and we will see how they set the stage for the unfolding of other historical events (such as World War II).

American Economy in the 1920s: Consumerism, Stock Market & Economic Shift

6. American Economy in the 1920s: Consumerism, Stock Market & Economic Shift

In this lesson we will learn about the American economy throughout the 1920s. We will explore the role of consumerism and the stock market during this time, and we will learn how the prosperity of the decade came to a crashing halt.

The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

7. The Great Depression: The Wall Street Crash of 1929 and Other Causes

October 29, 1929, marked the beginning of the Great Depression in the United States. Learn about this event, including the factors that contributed to the collapse of the American economy.

President Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression

8. President Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression

During his tenure, President Herbert Hoover attempted to end the Great Depression. Learn about his various policies in dealing with the economic collapse and their overall impact on the Depression in this video lesson.

America During the Great Depression: The Dust Bowl, Unemployment & Cultural Issues

9. America During the Great Depression: The Dust Bowl, Unemployment & Cultural Issues

The Great Depression was a period of economic hardship for a majority of Americans. Learn about the devastating conditions created by the Depression and the American response to the tragedy.

The Great Depression Around the World: Causes, Impact & Responses

10. The Great Depression Around the World: Causes, Impact & Responses

What triggered the Great Depression throughout the globe? In this lesson, you'll learn how the world's biggest financial crisis spread from the United States to other industrialized nations and how they responded to it.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First New Deal: The First 100 Days

11. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the First New Deal: The First 100 Days

President Franklin Roosevelt's first New Deal program represented an aggressive legislative campaign to relieve American suffering and end the Great Depression. Learn more about the first 100 days of the New Deal.

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Second New Deal

12. Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Second New Deal

President Franklin Roosevelt's second New Deal represented a more conservative approach to battling the Great Depression. Learn more about the program, including its legislation and legacy.

Chapter Practice Exam
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Practice Final Exam
Test your knowledge of the entire course with a 50 question practice final exam.
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