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ATM Technician: Job Description and Info for Becoming an ATM Technician

Mar 14, 2019

Research the educational and skill requirements needed to become an ATM technician, as well as the job description and employment and salary outlook. Read on to decide if this career is right for you.

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Career Defined for an ATM Technician

Automated teller machine (ATM) technicians, also called ATM servicers or repairers, diagnose, repair and install ATM machines. ATM field technicians travel to client locations to diagnose and fix problems on site or remove the machine and take it back to the shop where it will be worked on by ATM bench technicians. Using equipment that includes multi-meters, diagnostic software and hand tools, ATM technicians fix problems such as worn card readers and malfunctioning cash dispensing systems. As the financial industry implements new technology, more ATM technicians will be required to work on electronic kiosks as well.

Education Associate degrees available, high school education necessary
Certification Credentials available through the International Society of Certified Electronics Technicians and the Electronics Technicians Association International
Job Skills Heavy lifting, understanding of information technology, problem-solving skills, communication skills
Median Salary (2017) $37,710 for computer, automated teller and office machine repairers*
Job Growth (2016-2026) -2% for computer, automated teller and office machine repairers*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Educational Requirements

Although many ATM technicians hold a high school diploma, some entry-level workers are required to have earned an associate's degree, which may include courses such as programming fundamentals, microprocessors, electro-mechanical systems and calculus. Postsecondary education in applicable fields may be earned at a vocational school, where students learn the basics of ATM mechanics, circuits and transistors. Despite the electrical knowledge a candidate may have when hired, the vast majority of new employees receive on-the-job training, which can last several months, on the specific machines they will be working on.

Certification Requirements

Employers are particularly interested in applicants with additional certification, such as that offered by the International Society of Certified Electronics Technicians (ISCET). Additionally, more than 80 certification programs in many electronic specialty fields are offered by the Electronics Technicians Association International (ETA).

Required Skills

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that ATM technicians need the following qualities:

  • Communication skills, a professional appearance and a driver's license
  • Agility, since technicians must work in odd postures
  • Strength to lift heavy equipment
  • Creative and analytical problem-solving skills
  • Familiarity with information technology

Employment and Salary Outlook

The BLS noted that as of May 2017, median annual earnings for all computer, ATM and office-machine repairers were $37,710. The majority of these workers were employed on a full-time basis, although the need for repair on weekends and holidays may result in overtime work opportunities. Employment of these workers is expected to decline slowly from 2016-2026 at a projected rate of 2%. The need for ATM repairers may fall, as the increased use of electronic banking has caused a reduction in ATM usage.

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