Associate of Corporate Transcription: Degree Overview

It is not possible to earn an associate's degree in corporate transcription, but you can enroll in a similar program. Find out more about this alternative in order to decide whether it is consistent with your educational needs and career goals.

Essential Information

Since there are no specific associate's degree programs in corporate transcription, people who are interested in this field typically earn an associate's degree in captioning and court reporting. These two-year programs are typically offered by community colleges and technical schools, and they train students to create verbatim records of court procedures and corporate proceedings, such as board of directors' meetings, discussions at business conventions, stockholders' meetings, conferences, and arbitration hearings.

Students learn how to use special transcription equipment, such as stenotype machines connected to laptop computers. Special computer programs turn the coded keystrokes into a transcript, which the student must review for spelling, grammar and accuracy.


Associate of Corporate Transcription

In addition to taking specialized courses in transcription, students must also complete core curriculum courses in English, social studies, science and math. Also, because many reporters are self-employed, some schools offer elective courses in business. Possible course titles include:

  • Introduction to court reporting
  • Building speed
  • Court reporting technology
  • Running a small business
  • Corporate communications

Employment Outlook and Salary Information

Many corporate transcribers work as freelancers, making written records of meetings on a contract basis. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) expected employment for court reporters of all types to grow by 2% from 2014-2024. The mean annual salary for court reporters was $54,720 in May 2015.

Continuing Education and Certification

Many states require court reporters who work in legal settings to be licensed, but corporate transcriptionists may be exempt from these requirements. Organizations such as the National Verbatim Reporters Association, the American Association of Electronic Reporters and Transcribers and the National Court Reporters Association offer voluntary certification to court reporters who meet education and experience requirements. They must complete continuing education requirements, such as taking courses and attending conferences, to maintain certification.

Overall, an associate's degree in captioning and court reporting adequately prepares students to work as transcriptionists in legal or corporate settings. By combining specialized studies in the field with general education courses and basic business training, these programs help students gain the skills they need to gain licensure and work as contractors in the field.


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