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Casino Manager: Job Description & Career Requirements

See what education casino managers typically have. Read on to learn about the job skills and salary and career statistics for casino managers, along with similar job options.

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Career Information for a Casino Manager

Casino managers, sometimes also referred to as gaming managers, oversee the day-to-day operations of gaming facilities. Casino managers' duties include supervising personnel, monitoring gaming areas, overseeing security services, ensuring that gaming rules are followed and monitoring compliance with regulatory requirements. Casino managers may have long or unusual hours because many casinos are open around the clock.

Education No standard educational requirement, but employers may prefer an associate's degree; in-house training often provided; most states require licensure
Job Skills Customer service skills, management skills, interpersonal skills, communication skills
Mean Annual Salary (2015)* $77,770 (all gaming managers)
Job Growth (2014-2024)* 1% increase (all gaming service workers)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Educational Requirements

There is no standard education requirement to work as a casino manager, although many employers prefer candidates who have at least a 2-year associate's degree; common courses that are helpful include English, mathematics and communications. Many gaming operations offer in-house training for their employees. In most states, you'll also need to obtain a license from a gaming control or gambling commission, which generally requires photo identification and the payment of a fee.

Job Skills

To succeed as a casino manager, you'll need strong customer service skills. Because this is a role where you'll be overseeing people, you will also need good management, interpersonal and communication skills.

Employment and Economic Outlook

The employment outlook for gaming service positions, including casino management, was slower than average when compared to other occupational fields; the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projected little or no growth (1% increase) from 2014-2024. The average annual income in 2015 for gaming managers was $77,770.

Alternative Career Options

Similar career options within this field include:

Lodging Manager

In 2015, the BLS reported that lodging managers made a mean income of $57,810 and that between 2014 and 2024, lodging managers could experience 8% growth in the number of available jobs. Lodging managers supervise all the activities of a hotel and its staff. Managers may enter the field with a high school diploma and gain work experience; alternatively, some have earned an associate's or bachelor's degree in a related field.

Gaming Surveillance Officer

Also called gaming investigators, these professionals monitor casino operations with the use of audio and video equipment. A high school diploma is typically sufficient, but specialized casino training may be required. Based on 2014-2024 predictions from the BLS, gaming surveillance officers and gaming investigators were expected to see a 7% decline in employment during the decade. Gaming surveillance officers and gaming investigators had an average income of $33,880, according to the BLS, as of 2015.

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