College Career Guide: Stay Away From Workplace Drama

Your first post-graduation job probably makes all your hard studying pay off. Don't ruin it by falling into these snags.

Burning bridges is probably the last thing anybody wants to do in their first job after college. Getting into trouble is a lot easier in the world of office politics than in the world of student life. Here are some areas you might want to avoid, just to be on the safe side.

Politics

Just because you have an opinion doesn't mean you should voice it to your coworkers. College students are expected to be outspoken, but not necessarily entry-level employees.

Silencing your opinion doesn't mean you have to be a spineless new-bee. Instead, if you wish to discuss politics, think about what you wish to accomplish with the discussion. According to workplace monthly Fast Company (fastcompany.com), if your goal is to change coworkers' minds, learn first their opinion and how they formed it. This will allow you to understand your coworkers, then a level of trust can be shared between you.

Gossip

Gossip is a tough one to avoid because most people love getting the dirt. (This is why the gossip pages are continually among the most read sections of our beloved newspapers.) But try as hard as you can to avoid becoming the source of gossip. Career portal Monster.com says gossip is a surefire way to get coworkers to stop trusting you. Listening to gossip is fun, just don't start circulating the rumors.

Know-It-All

Contrary to what they tell you in college, you don't really know everything. Even when you have the best way of getting things done, a 30-year veteran of the company can take offense to some young upstart changing the system.

Rewriting your job description is another way to rub heads the wrong way. While change is always good, sometimes tradition has the upper hand. Monster.com says to offer new ideas occasionally, but be sensible to the desires of your superior.


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