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Dental Biller: Salary, Requirements and Career Information

A dental biller requires little formal education. Learn about the training options, job duties and requirements to see if this is the right career for you.

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Dental billers spend most of their day on administrative tasks, specifically working with insurance, patient coverage and payment options. They can take trade-skill programs to prepare for this job, and potential employers may look for candidates with experience in the dental industry.

Essential Information

Dental billers work with patients and insurance companies processing claims and billing patients. Employment is available for graduates right out of high school, but many individuals who are interested in this career enroll in a certificate program in medical billing and coding that will train them in the skills needed for work in a dental office. These programs sometimes include internships. Individuals in this job need to be organized, have an eye for detail and be excellent communicators.

Required Education High school diploma or GED certificate, although many individuals earn certificates in medical billing and coding
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) 13% for all billing and posting clerks*
Median Salary (2016) $35,769**

Sources: * U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), **PayScale.com

Salary Information for a Dental Biller

According to Payscale.com, most dental insurance billers working in January 2016 earned salaries between $23,893 and $53,163 a year, or between $11.64 and $21.54 an hour. Income earned can vary depending on experience, education, location and employer. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported in May 2015 that the median annual salary earned by all billing and posting clerks was $35,050. Those working in dentists' offices earned a mean annual wage of $38,280 the same year.

Educational and Career Requirements

Many employers require that prospective dental billers have a minimum of a high school diploma to be eligible for this type of position. There are also training programs available in medical billing, such as a medical billing and coding specialist certificate program. Students are trained in procedural and diagnostic coding, learn about insurance principles and are educated in medical record-keeping. Some programs include an internship at a practicing medical office.

Employers of dental billers also seek those who have experience in the dental industry in positions such as dental assistant, clerical assistant in a dentist's office or other related jobs.

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Career Information

A career in dental billing requires the employee to spend the majority of the day working on the computer and making phone calls. Job duties include collecting payment, verifying patient coverage eligibility, making phone calls to insurance companies about claims and collecting outstanding balances. In addition, dental billers are in charge of entering insurance claims data into the computer. Dental billers must research any potential fraudulent insurance claims and communicate with insurance companies and patients.

People who pursue this career must have a good eye for detail because dental billers write and review individual patient's billing information and procedure data. Communication is essential; workers must be able to explain insurance claims and billing information to patients. Many employers require the worker be able to type a minimum of 30 words per minute. Experienced dental billers can work from home using email, fax and telephone to complete tasks. Workers must be familiar with basic dental terminology since they will be reading patient records. They will also have to know how to properly translate procedures and diagnoses into dental coding.

Dental billers starting out may find it helpful to complete a formal training program or get experience in the dental industry performing administrative and secretarial tasks, which fall under billers' job responsibilities. Dental billers must also have strong typing and communication skills and know how to translate dental procedures into codes. Although they most often work within a dental office, dental billers with experience may also be able to work from home.

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