Healthcare Office Manager: Job Description, Duties and Requirements

Nov 20, 2019

Healthcare office managers are medical professionals who focus more heavily on the administrative needs of hospitals, clinics, and doctor's offices. Find out about medical office manager duties, salary, job descriptions, and more by reading below.

Medical Office Manager Job Description

Healthcare office managers, also known as medical office managers, are administrative staff who handle the day-to-day operations of medical facilities, such as doctor's offices, hospitals or nursing homes. Medical office manager responsibilities are in many ways similar to those of other types of office managers, in that they must create schedules, manage budgets, maintain records and assign work to those under them. However, there are also numerous other responsibilities that medical office managers must attend to, such as ensuring the facility complies with government regulations in regards to healthcare and sensitive personal information.

As one might expect, medical office managers work closely with doctors, nurses, and allied health personnel at their facility to ensure that patients are receiving adequate care. They may also interact with insurance companies and medical suppliers. Medical office managers typically work full-time schedules, and the position is one that may require overtime on occasion.

Medical Office Manager Education Requirements

To begin a career as a medical office manager, it is generally required to hold at least a bachelor's degree, although master's degrees are sometimes preferred. Degrees in areas such as public health administration, business administration, and nursing are among the most common. Bachelor's degree programs in these majors commonly include courses such as:

  • Healthcare information systems management
  • Leadership and ethics in healthcare
  • Quality assessment for patient care improvement
  • Finance for healthcare

While an education in medicine is not strictly necessary, some courses in basic areas such as anatomy and physiology or microbiology may be worthwhile. For individuals who are already educated in a medical field, such as nurses, and are looking to advance their careers, past work experience can be very beneficial, especially when combined with a master's degree. Online programs in business administration and healthcare administration are fairly common, and can usually be completed entirely online.

Medical Office Manager Licensure and Certification Requirements

Certain positions may require that job candidates hold a valid Registered Nurse (RN) license or social work license, and nursing home administrators must be licensed in every state. To receive a license to work as a nursing home administrator in most states, an individual must be a legal adult, hold a bachelor's degree, complete any state-mandated training, and pass the licensing exam. Consult the licensing board in your state for the most accurate information.

Certification is not required to work as a medical office manager in most states. However, it may be well-regarded by potential employers. While several certifying organizations exist, some with a high degree of specificity, the primary certifying organization for medical office managers is the Professional Association of Healthcare Office Management (PAHCOM), which offers a credential known as the Certified Medical Manager (CMM). To earn this credential, an applicant must have at least 2 years of administration experience and have completed 12 credits of post-secondary education that is directly related to healthcare administration. For those with greater than 2 years of experience, each additional year reduces the number of credits required by 1. Applicants must then pass a certification exam consisting of 200 questions that cover a variety of areas related to healthcare administration. The CMM credential is then valid for 2 years and must be renewed by completing 24 continuing education units.

Medical Office Manager Salary

Medical and health service managers had a median annual income of $99,730 in 2018, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Those working for the government or at hospitals had the highest median pay, at $110,460 and $108,730 respectively, while medical office managers working at residential care and nursing home facilities made $84,260. Job growth for medical and health service managers is exceptional. It's predicted to be at 18% over the ten years from 2018 to 2028. Much of this growth is attributed to the medical needs of the large elderly population in the U.S., although growth in areas related to electronic health records is also significant. Those seeking work in this field can expect to see the best results if they possess a master's degree or education in healthcare information systems.

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