Improve Your Teaching: 10 Best Blogs for Teachers

Jan 02, 2019

The discipline of teaching has benefited as much from technology as the classroom itself. All over the country (and the world!), teachers and educators are sharing experiences, resources, insights and anecdotes from the blogosphere. From cool classroom science projects to daily links for English teachers, these blogs offer everything you need to improve your teaching - and get the occasional good laugh.

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1. The Fischbowl

This blog by math educator Karl Fisch is written for both educators and students, and it is bursting with instructional gems. Fisch offers everything from advice on using small-scale philanthropy for algebra instruction to analysis of the Common Core Standards.

2. Weblogg-ed

Educator Will Richardson has been edu-blogging for almost a decade, and Weblogg-ed is still going strong. The blog is full of anecdotes about teaching, classroom tips and thoughtful reflection on the state of public education today.

3. Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day

Do you teach English, language arts or ESL? Don't miss Larry Ferlazzo's Websites of the Day, in which he shares a wealth of resources on English learning and general education. Links include books, videos, instructional websites, tips for integrating technology into the classroom and a whole lot more.

4. Science Fix

Seeking ideas for fun in-class science projects? Look no further than Science Fix, where middle school teacher Darren Fix shares his favorite demos, from making sugary goo to lighting your hand on fire (safely!). He even includes videos of each experiment.

5. A Year of Reading

This blog is great for elementary teachers looking for new books and ideas to help making reading fun and accessible for kids. The authors are two educators who've been teaching for more than 20 years and offer book reviews and tips on invaluable reading tools and resources.

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6. Creating Lifelong Learners

Looking for ways to integrate technology into your classroom? Matthew Needleman offers practical and fun advice for teaching 'digital literacy' to your students no matter level of tech expertise you have. He'll show you how to use multimedia as a learning tool and give you tips on easy ways to download and share educational YouTube videos. The blog is also peppered with thoughtful ideas on everything from teaching 'authentic writing' to treating art as a discipline.

7. Teach Paperless

If you're seeking ways to become more eco-friendly or need ideas on how to effectively teach with technology, head over to Teach Paperless. This blog explores practical ways to eliminate paper from the classroom and offers insightful reflections on how technology can help - and hurt - public education.

8. Free Technology for Teachers

Okay, so you're ready to go paperless, but isn't technology awfully expensive for your average public school classroom? Not with the excellent free resources and lesson plans you can find on the Free Technology for Teachers blog. From a free web search that helps teachers find resources appropriate for their students' reading abilities to no-cost guides on project-based learning, this blog is bursting with useful tech gems for any classroom.

9. The Scholastic Scribe

This experienced high school teacher offers 'lessons learned in the classroom and beyond,' from humorous tales of classroom management to reflections on the joys and rewards of building strong student-teacher relationships.

10. The Principal's Page

Need a little humorous insight into the administrative side of education? Check out Michael Smith's Principal's Page. After spending several years as a teacher, coach and principal, he's currently working as a superintendent in a public school district in Illinois. Michael blogs about everything from the joys and frustrations of snow days to tips for effective education reform.

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