Job Description of a Landscape Foreman

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a landscape foreman. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about degree programs and job duties to find out if this is the career for you.

Aspiring landscape foremen should become aware of the annual median salary and projected job growth rate before pursuing lawn service, groundskeeping, or supervisor roles. Most professionals will need a high school diploma or a college degree to work as a landscape foreman.

Essential Information

Landscape foremen oversee crews of groundskeepers, coordinating workers' efforts to ensure proper maintenance of the grounds and use of equipment under their care. Employers may require an associate's degree in horticulture and on-the-job training as a landscape worker.

Required Education High school diploma, associate's degree in horticulture recommended
Other Requirements On-the-job training as a landscape worker
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024) 5% (first-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service and groundskeeping workers)*
Median Salary (2015) $43,980 annually (first-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service and groundskeeping workers)*

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Job Duties

Also known as landscape crew leaders, landscape foremen coordinate crews of workers in groundskeeping activities. They schedule employees and oversee equipment operation as well as ensuring that the property under their charge is well-maintained. They might also be responsible for training employees in their tasks.

Landscape foremen might work for private organizations, such as businesses with lots of real estate (i.e. golf course or shopping mall), or they could work for public parks. Their job involves the use of a lot of different equipment, from hand tools like rakes and shovels to motorized vehicles, such as lawn mowers and trucks. They might also work with pesticides or other chemicals.

Landscape foremen might be responsible for the construction of new outdoor areas like walkways and patios, or their primary charge may be maintaining existing grounds. Irrigating, lawn mowing, and other such horticultural duties fall under their purview. Besides that, their job requires performing several administrative duties like preparing cost estimates and scheduling maintenance.

Requirements

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), most landscaping jobs don't require any formal education; instead, workers learn the skills they need on-the-job. However, becoming a landscape foreman requires a little more education and experience. A November 2016 survey of open job postings for landscape foremen on the websites Monster.com and Careerbuilder.com showed that organizations looked for foremen with landscaping work experience as well as a two-year degree in a horticultural field. Associate's degrees in horticulture focus on ornamental horticulture technology, which directly prepare students for landscape management jobs.

The BLS notes that demonstrating proficient landscaping skills can facilitate a move to supervisor or foreman. In addition, one can earn certification in the field to show one's ability. It's available from both the Professional Grounds Management Society and the Professional Landcare Network. Both offer different types of certification depending on one's professional experience and expertise.

Salary Info and Job Outlook

According to the BLS, the employment of first-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service, and groundskeeping workers is projected to increase by 5% from 2014 to 2024. Additionally, the BLS reported in May 2015 that the median salary earned by such supervisors was $43,980 annually.

Landscape foremen need skills in lawn maintenance, construction, and supervisory duties if they want to take succeed. A high school diploma and proper job training will prepare you for this profession, along with landscaping experience.


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