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Job Description of an Appliance Repair Technician

Working as an appliance repair technician requires little to no formal education. Learn about the training, job duties and certification to see if this is the right career for you.

Appliance repair technicians install, inspect and repair home appliances. They usually work on-site in client's homes as well as in repair shops. The median annual salary for appliance repair technicians is around $36,000, and it's important to note that jobs in the field are expected to decline in number.

Essential Information

Appliance repair technicians service home appliances, including dishwashers, washers and dryers, ranges, air conditioners, refrigerators, vacuum cleaners and microwaves. Larger appliances are generally repaired on-site; smaller appliances may be repaired at a shop. Although no formal education is required for this career, programs related to electronics repair are available. Most technicians have completed an apprenticeship with more experienced technicians and undergo a period of on-the-job training with employment.

Required Education Apprenticeships and on-the-job training are most common for repairers; technical programs related to electronics are available
Other Requirements Voluntary certifications available through the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the International Society of Certified Electronics Technicians (ISCET) or the Certified Appliance Professional (CAP)
Projected Career Outlook (2014-2024) -3% for home appliance repairers*
Median Salary (2015) $36,200 for home appliance repairers*

Sources: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

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Job Description

An appliance repair technician installs and troubleshoots washers, ranges and other large appliances for their customers. They must know how to connect water or gas lines, and how to check for leaks once the appliances are installed. They instruct their customers on how to operate the appliances properly. Repair technicians must repair or replace any defective components found in appliances. They must know how to dismantle and reassemble appliances to make their diagnosis.

Other job duties may include record keeping, bill preparation, repair estimates and inventory control. Appliance repair technicians must also have good customer service skills and a clean driver's license record.

Education and Certification

Apprenticeships are a common way to acquire training and skills. Apprentices work under the supervision of experienced repair technicians. They also may learn their craft through training courses offered by employers. Appliance manufacturers may offer training seminars. For small appliance repair, an apprenticeship may be all that is required to secure employment.

For more formal training, individuals can enroll in technical or vocational programs that focus on electronics courses. This education may reduce the on-the-job training required. After graduation and necessary experience, and depending on the areas of specialty, appliance technicians can apply for certifications from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the International Society of Certified Electronics Technicians (ISCET) or the Certified Appliance Professional (CAP).

It is important for appliance repair technicians to continue their training throughout their career to keep up with changing technology.

Salary and Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), appliance repair technicians earned between $10.41 per hour and $29.19 per hour in May 2015. Wages varied depending on location, type of equipment repaired and the skill level of technicians. The top-paying industries were natural gas distribution and wholesale electronic markets and brokers. The BLS predicted a decline of 3% in employment opportunities for home appliance repairers from 2014-2024.

Appliance repair technicians usually require no formal education - most are trained on-the-job or as part of an apprenticeship. However, technical and vocational programs with electronics coursework are available and may be helpful. Certification is available as well, though generally not required.


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