Landscaping Supervisor: Job Duties & Career Info

Read about the job responsibilities of a landscaping supervisor. Explore salary data, employment outlook, training requirements and necessary skills to make the right career decision.

Career Definition for a Landscaping Supervisor

Landscaping supervisors supervise gardeners who maintain the landscapes around commercial businesses, private residences and government facilities. Working with the client they determine when to do maintenance on trees, shrubs and plants on a client's property. They may also be responsible for hiring, training and driving temporary landscaping crews. The maintenance of equipment used on job sites is also the responsibility of the landscaping supervisor.

Education High school or general education diploma
Job Skills Knowledge of tree and plant diseases, insect infestations, and botany, good customer service skills
Median Salary (2015)* $43,980 (for landscaping, lawn service and groundskeeping supervisors)
Job Growth (2014-2024)* 5% (for landscaping, lawn service and groundskeeping supervisors)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Required Education

Becoming a landscaping supervisor requires a high school diploma or general education diploma from a certified program. A landscaping supervisor must have training regarding safety practices for using landscaping equipment, pesticides and other chemicals. A driver's license and a good driving record are also required. Previous landscaping experience and the flexibility to supervise seasonal and temporary work crews is necessary.

Skills Required

Landscape supervisors are expected to have knowledge of how to protect trees and plants from diseases and insect infestations. Good customer service skills are also required for working with clients. Extensive knowledge about botany, growing seasons and climate zones is essential.

Career and Economic Outlook

The demand for landscaping supervisors is expected to grow by 5% from 2014-2024. Landscaping supervisors will be needed to oversee the crews that work on these private properties. Winter makes landscaping work seasonal in many northern states. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported the median annual income for landscaping supervisors at $43,980 in May 2015.

Alternative Careers

Careers that are similar to a landscape supervisor include:

Landscape Architect

For those who want to work with landscaping design, becoming a landscape architect could be the right career decision. These professionals consult with the client, draft out a design, select plants and materials, prepare a budget and inspect the installation. To qualify for employment, one must earn a bachelor's or master's degree in landscape architecture and obtain experience in an internship. All non-government architects must also be licensed after completing specified education and training. In May of 2015, the BLS reported that landscape architects earned a median salary of $63,810. They also expect 5% employment growth in this field between 2014 and 2024.

Agricultural Manager

If a supervisory position involving plants and other botanical life is desired, becoming an agricultural manager may be of interest. These managers oversee operations at nurseries, farms, ranches and other similar businesses. They determine logistical arrangements of storage and transport, plan and manage budgets, hire workers and make sure equipment is running properly. Most agricultural managers have a high school diploma and extensive work experience in the field. However, many employers are beginning to prefer candidates who have earned a degree in agricultural science or a related field of study.

During the 2014-2024 decade, the BLS predicts a 2% decrease in job opportunities for those professionals because of the increase in corporate purchasing of farms. Farmers, ranchers and other agricultural managers received an annual median wage of $64,170, as reported by the BLS in 2015.


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