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License Clerk: Job Information and Career Requirements

A license or permit clerk is usually employed by some type of a governmental agency. Read on to find more information about the training, skills, salary and employment outlook for this career.

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Career Definition for a License Clerk

A license or permit clerk often works for a local, state, or federal entity and assists in the collection of information from applicants seeking permits or licenses. The license or permit clerk may be required to collect fees and administer tests or exams to determine performance, such as vision test. Some clerks, such as driver's license clerks or business license clerks, may only work in one area, while others may assist in issuing a variety of permits and licenses.

Required Education High school diploma or GED, and passing competency exams
Job Skills Attention to detail, accuracy, computer proficiency, operating camera equipment, balance receipts, and work a cash register
Median Salary (May 2015)* $35,850
Job Growth (2014-2024)* 4%

Source: *United States Bureau of Labor Statistics

Required Education

License or permit clerks typically require a high school diploma or GED and passing scores on competency exams in such subjects as simple math, spelling, punctuation, and grammar. Clerks that issue specialized permits may be required to have some education related to the permit subject. For example, clerks issuing building permits may be required to have some education in construction practices or experience in the building industry.

Skills Required

A license or permit clerk career requires attention to detail and accuracy in recording information. Computer proficiency is necessary since many license clerk jobs require information retrieval from computer databases and data entry. Additionally, some jobs may require operating camera equipment for licenses or permits that include photos. License and permit clerks may also collect fees and thus may need to know how to balance receipts and work a cash register.

Skill in dealing with the public is an important component of the profession. Some clerk jobs require customer service experience.

Career and Economic Outlook

A position as a license or permit clerk may be a first job for someone just out of high school, and much of the training occurs on the job. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov), the median annual salary for a license or permit clerk was $35,850 in May 2015. Employment in the field is projected to grow at a slower than average pace of 4% from 2014 through 2024, per the BLS.

Alternate Career Options

Similar occupations to a license clerk include the following:

Material Recording Clerk

Usually having a high school diploma, some of these clerks need computer skills, and those who've completed some business courses might have the best job prospects, according to the BLS. In general, these positions involve tracking and guaranteeing the accuracy of the recordkeeping, scheduling and inventory tracking in businesses. Three percent growth in the number of available positions was anticipated by the BLS for these jobs from 2014-2024. The median annual wage reported in 2015 by the BLS was $26,240.

Financial Clerk

Financial clerks normally learn their skills through on-the-job training, although those interested in working as brokerage clerks might take courses or complete degrees. Financial clerks, in general, assist customers, keep records and complete financial transactions. As fast as average employment growth of 6% was projected by the BLS during the 2014-2024 decade, and these professionals earned a median salary of $37,040 per year in 2015.


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