Medical Front Desk Coordinator: Education Requirements and Career Info

Sep 17, 2019

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a medical front desk coordinator. Get a quick view of the requirements as well as details about degree programs, job duties and necessary skills to find out if this is the career for you.

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Medical front desk coordinators are required to have a high school diploma. Postsecondary training in office management, computer skills and knowledge of medical terminology may help increase job prospects for those seeking work in this field.

Essential Information

Medical front desk coordinators are responsible for performing the administrative duties associated with medical offices. While a high school diploma is the minimum educational requirement for these professionals, some employers may prefer candidates with an associate's degree or certificate in medical office administration.

Required Education High school diploma at minimum; employers may prefer some form of postsecondary education
Other Requirements Ability to work with computers and basic knowledge of medical technology
Projected Job Growth (2018-2028)* 16% for medical secretaries
Median Salary (2018)* $35,760 for medical secretaries

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Education Requirements for Medical Front Desk Coordinators

According to job listings posted on Careerbuilder.com in 2014, a high school diploma or its equivalent is typically the only educational requirement to become a medical front desk coordinator. However, some employers may prefer to hire employees with postsecondary training. Additionally, computer skills and knowledge of basic medical technology are often essential in this field, and these skills can be learned through educational programs. Prospective medical front desk coordinators can enroll in certificate and associate's degree programs specifically tailored to individuals interested in working in medical front office environments.

Curriculum

Certificate and degree programs are available in medical office administration. These programs generally award the Certificate of Achievement, Certificate of Completion, Associate in Applied Science or Associate in Science, and they all offer coursework designed to prepare students for careers in medical front desk coordination and related areas. Courses students might take include keyboarding, document processing, medical terminology, record management, healthcare professionalism, medical office coding, medical insurance, basic accounting, legal issues in the medical field and business communications. Depending on the institution, internship options may be available.

Career Info

Medical front desk coordinators typically have multiple responsibilities, including contacting and communicating with patients and scheduling appointments. Job duties may include answering phones, scheduling appointments, developing relationships with clients, data entry, handling medical files, filing insurance claims and billing patients. Depending on the employer, medical front desk coordinators may be required to have previous experience in healthcare administration. Some employers may also prefer to hire medical front desk coordinators familiar with specific software applications.

Salary and Job Outlook

According to PayScale.com in September 2019, front desk receptionists who worked in medical offices and earned annual salaries in the 10th-90th percentile range took home $22,000-$41,000. The median was $30,211.

Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) doesn't specifically compile reports for medical front desk coordinators, the organization does provide information for medical secretaries. The BLS predicted that employment of medical secretaries would increase much faster than the national average through 2028. Individuals with strong computer skills and relevant experience should have the best job prospects.

Medical front desk coordinators play an important role in processing patients, filing paperwork, completing insurance claims, and fulfilling the day to day administrative duties in a doctor's office, hospital, or clinic. Postsecondary training isn't required, although some employers may prefer a candidate who has completed a certificate or associate's degree program.

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