Pediatric Endocrinologist Career Information

Find out what pediatric endocrinologists do. See what kind of education and training are required for employment. Explore career prospects to decide if this field is a good fit for you.

Career Definition for a Pediatric Endocrinologist

Pediatric endocrinology is a type of medical specialty dealing with children who have metabolic or growth disorders. Pediatric endocrinologists treat children who have type one diabetes, growth disorders, intersex disorders, hypoglycemia, and other disorders relating to the adrenal, thyroid, and pituitary glands. Common duties for pediatric endocrinologists include seeing and evaluating patients, providing treatment, recording care, and making referrals.

Required Education A bachelor's degree in a field related to medicine; 4 years in medical school; 3 years' pediatric residency; 3 years' pediatric endocrinology fellowship
Job Duties Include seeing and evaluating patients, recording care, making referrals
Median Salary (2017)* $172,650 (all pediatricians)
Job Outlook (2016-2026)* 15% growth (all pediatricians)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Required Education

The road to becoming a pediatric endocrinologist is a long one; you'll need to complete a four-year bachelor's degree, preferably in a field relevant to medicine, complete four years of medical school, three years of a pediatric residency, and three more years of training in a pediatric endocrinology fellowship. Common bachelor's degree programs that will help prepare you for a career as a pediatric endocrinologist include biology, chemistry, and pre-med. Typical undergraduate coursework in these programs includes organic chemistry, biochemistry, genetics, human anatomy, physiology, and ethics.

Licensing Requirement

Physicians, including pediatric endocrinologists, are required to be licensed by the state in which by practice. State licensing requirements vary.

Skills Required

To successfully complete all the required coursework and licensing work to become a pediatric endocrinologist will require dedication, intelligence, and endurance. As a practicing pediatric endocrinologist, the abilities to prioritize tasks, communicate well with patients and their families, and multi-task will serve you well.

Employment and Economic Outlook

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS, www.bls.gov), the career outlook for pediatric endocrinologists is good. According to economic data for the wider field of pediatricians, which includes pediatric endocrinologists, employment in this field is expected to grow 15% from 2016-2026. The annual median income in May 2017 for pediatricians, which includes pediatric endocrinologists, was $172,650, per the BLS.

Alternate Career Options

Here are some examples of alternative career options:

Physician Assistant

A physician assistant (PA) works under the supervision of a licensed physician to provide health care to patients. PAs typically perform duties according to their employing doctor's area of specialty, such as emergency medicine, pediatrics, surgery, and so on. PAs can examine patients, authorize medical tests, make diagnoses, and write prescriptions.

Employment requires completion of an approved master's degree program in physician assisting. State licensing is necessary as well, and includes sitting for the Physician Assistant National Certifying Examination (PANCE), although requirements can vary by location.

According to the BLS, the number of jobs for PAs is estimated to increase 37% from 2016-2026; PAs earned a median salary of $104,860 in 2017, with the highest-paying jobs in hospitals and outpatient care centers.

Registered Nurse

Doctor's offices, hospitals, and nursing care facilities are among the employers of registered nurses (RNs). These professionals can pursue one of several educational paths - a diploma, associate's degree or bachelor's degree, although some employers prefer candidates with a 4-year degree. A passing score on the National Council Licensure Examination, or NCLEX-RN, is required for employment; additional state requirements may apply. RNs can expect employment to increase 15% from 2016-2026, per the BLS, and the median salary for this occupation was $70,000 in 2017.


What is your highest level of education?

Some College
Complete your degree or find the graduate program that's right for you.
High School Diploma
Explore schools that offer bachelor and associate degrees.
Still in High School
Earn your diploma or GED. Plan your undergraduate education.

Schools you may like:

Popular Schools

The listings below may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users.

Find your perfect school

What is your highest level of education?