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Recruiting Coordinator: Education Requirements and Career Information

Learn about the education and preparation needed to become a recruiting coordinator. Get a quick view of the education requirements, job duties and career information to find out if this is the right choice for you.

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Acting as an intermediary between job seekers and a business, recruiting coordinators are human resource specialists who are responsible for finding and recruiting the most suitable candidates for a position. Duties of the job include conducting interviews, communicating with recruits and business, and attending job fairs. An undergraduate degree is required to work in this field.

Essential Information

Recruiting coordinators are in charge of bringing new employees to their organization. They seek out the most suitable candidates and attempt to win over their services. This human resources position typically requires a 4-year college education in a field like HR, labor law, business administration, industrial psychology or behavioral science, as well as some professional experience with the hiring process.

Required Education Bachelor's degree
Other Requirements Work experience in the field
Projected Job Growth (2014-2024)* 5% for human resource specialists
Median Annual Salary (May 2015)* $58,350 for human resource specialists

Source: *United States Bureau of Labor Statistics

Find schools that offer these popular programs

  • Human Resources Development
  • Labor and Industrial Relations
  • Labor Studies
  • Organizational Behavior

Education Requirements for Recruiting Coordinators

A November 2014 search for recruiting coordinator openings on CareerBuilder.com revealed that a bachelor's degree and between two and five years of experience in human resources are typically required by employers, although in some cases, experience might act as a substitute for a 4-year degree. Aspiring recruiting coordinators might choose an undergraduate curriculum that prepares them for a career in human resources.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov) reports that, although many colleges don't offer degree programs in human resources, interested students should take a mixture of courses in business administration, behavioral and social science, labor law and industrial psychology. Specific classes in human resources are also available at the undergraduate level.

Additionally, some schools provide certificate programs in human resources. Certificate programs are available at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, and are open to students with varying amounts of professional experience. These programs aim to teach students the core concepts of human resource management, including employee performance appraisal and building relations with workers.

Finally, some schools offer graduate degree programs in human resources. Often these programs include courses specifically devoted to staffing an organization and analysis of the labor supply market, key duties of a recruiting coordinator. Like the certificate programs, enrollment is open to those of varied professional experience, although the curriculum of a master's program is usually more in-depth and specialized.

Career Information

Recruiting coordinators are tasked with bringing talented prospects into an organization in order to improve personnel. Typically, recruiting coordinators make contact with potential candidates, schedule interviews and facilitate communication between their employer and the new recruit. The job involves organization, computerized data entry and record-keeping. Recruiting coordinators may frequently travel to job fairs and interviews. They must also be able to sell potential recruits on the benefits of coming to their particular organization.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, human resource specialists, including recruiting specialists, are expected to see a 5% increase in employment opportunities from 2014-2024. The median annual wage for human resource specialists was $58,350 in May 2015.

Recruiting coordinators typically have a bachelor's degree in a program such as human resources, labor law, industrial psychology, or business administration. They must be highly organized individuals and be comfortable with record-keeping and data entry. Strong communication skills are also necessary, as one of the major responsibilities of the job is to persuade potential recruits to sign on with their organization.

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