Scheduling Manager: Job Duties & Career Requirements

Experience as an office assistant or receptionist can help prepare you for a career in scheduling management. Keep reading to learn more about how to become a scheduling manager. View article »

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  • 0:01 Career Definition
  • 0:26 Educational and Skill…
  • 1:17 Job Outlook and Salary
  • 1:46 Alternate Career Options

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Video Transcript

Career Definition for a Scheduling Manager

Education High school diploma or GED required, certificate and associate degree will help employment chances
Job Skills Communication, interpersonal skills, multitasking, human interaction
Median Salary (2015)* $39,820 to $75,687 for scheduling managers
Job Growth (2014-2024)** 8% for administrative services managers

Source: *Payscale, **U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

A scheduling manager is a specific type of administrative and office support manager. A scheduling manager is in charge of maintaining an office's calendar, including appointments, travel plans, meetings, and conferences. Common duties of a scheduling manager include scheduling office or client visits, updating individual and office-wide calendars, and planning for meetings, conferences, and trips.

Educational and Skill Requirements

While there are no specific education requirements for a career in scheduling management, you'll need at least your high school diploma or the GED equivalent; some post-secondary education, such as a certificate or associate's degree program, is likely to improve your job prospects in this field. Some common courses in a one- or two-year certificate or associate's program that could prepare you for a career in scheduling management include office management, computer applications, business communication, business correspondence, and administrative procedure. Many offices also offer specialized, on-the-job training for people hired for this position.

Scheduling managers must have very strong communication and interpersonal skills. Because they often interact with many people and deal with multiple tasks concurrently, they also need multitasking skills.

Job Outlook and Salary

The employment outlook for administrative services managers, which includes scheduling managers, is close to the national average; the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects that employment in this field will grow by 8% from 2014-2024. According to May 2016 data from Payscale.com, annual salaries for scheduling managers typically range from $39,820 to $75,687.

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Alternate Career Options

Property, Real Estate and Community Association Manager

Property, real estate and community association manager is another career that might appeal to those interested in administrative management. In general, these managers oversee a variety of aspects related to commercial, residential, and industrial properties, insuring their maintenance and positive appearance.

Depending on the position, requirements may include a high school diploma, postsecondary training, or a real estate license. In 2015, the BLS reported an annual median salary of $55,380 for property, real estate, and community association managers. The Bureau predicted average employment growth of 8% from 2014-2024.

Cost Estimator

Job prospects and salary are higher for cost estimators which are professionals who estimate the cost of resources necessary to construct a building or manufacture a product. The BLS reported a median wage of $60,390 for cost estimators as of 2015 and projected that positions in this field would increase at a faster than average rate of 9% from 2014-2024. A bachelor's degree is normally required, although individuals with extensive experience in construction may occasionally secure employment without a degree.

In summary, there are no specific education requirements for scheduling managers, which are administrative and office support professionals who maintain an office's calendar, including appointment, travel plans, meetings, and conferences. However, some post-secondary education is likely to improve prospects in this field.

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