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Today Is World Teachers' Day

Oct 05, 2010

On October 5, students and educators around the globe are celebrating World Teachers' Day 2010. This year's theme is 'Recovery begins with teachers.' The event is designed to draw attention to teachers worldwide who have been affected by major humanitarian and economic crises.

Classroom in a developing nation

Teachers: Recovery's Front Line

Earthquakes in Haiti and China. Floods in Pakistan. Economic crashes around the world.

These are just a few of the crises that have plagued the international community over the past couple of years. So this year, the organizers of World Teachers' Day set out to remind us that 'recovery begins with teachers.'

The event pays homage to the education professionals all over the world who are 'vital to social, economic and intellectual rebuilding.'

By educating the world's children, teachers provide society's true building blocks - and they're needed more than ever after a crisis. They provide frontline support, immediately working to promote recovery. According to UNESCO, 'Without teachers input to shape education reforms, recovery processes are not likely to achieve all their goals.'

Teachers

Share Your Love for Teachers

World Teachers' Day was created by UNESCO in 1994. It's recognized around the globe - in Uganda, October 5 is even a national holiday.

There are lots of different ways you can celebrate in your own hometown. Education International, a global teachers' union, maintains a website where you can share photos and download World Teachers' Day posters in many different languages.

Of course, the most important thing you can do to celebrate World Teachers' Day is to honor your teachers. You can send a free e-card to your favorite teacher through Education International's website, or give him or a her a shout out via Twitter by tagging your tweet with #wtd2010 to have it appear on the website's live feed.

And don't forget: November is National Human Rights Month. You can celebrate World Teachers' Day and get a head start on Human Rights Month by volunteering for a humanitarian organization such as UNICEF that helps educate children in crisis-afflicted regions.


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