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Administrative Analyst: Salary & Job Description

Administrative analysts can perform a wide range of duties that may vary depending on the field they work in. This article explores the daily role of administrative analysts and highlights potential salary, necessary skills, and required education.

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Career Definition of an Administrative Analyst

Some of an administrative analyst's tasks are comparable to the work of administrative assistants while they may also perform analytical duties and influence changes to polices and procedures. On a basic level they study workplace and business-related issues. Their work can involve evaluating information and identifying relevant data that needs to be stored and analyzed; administrative analysts also perform those tasks. They use a variety of computer programs to compile information. In order to ensure they have all the applicable data related to the topic they're studying they may question employees.

Once they have all the pertinent data they review the information and use it to draw conclusions that may help them determine ways to change procedures or improve business operations. In some cases their objective is to gather information that will be used by different departments to do things such as assessing employee performance. Administrative analysts may provide that information in the form of reports and they may also be responsible for making travel arrangements and other administrative tasks.

Educational Requirements Related experience or an associate's or bachelor's degree
Job Skills Computer skills, communication skills, analytical skills, problem-solving skills, organizational skills, customer service skills, time management skills
Median Salary (2017)* $52,301
Job Outlook (2016-2026)** 12% (management analysts)

Sources: *PayScale; **U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Required Education

The specific training requirements for administrative analysts can vary from employer to employer. While some seek applicants with an associate's or bachelor's degree, other employers will consider those with comparable relevant experience. Those preparing for this career by pursuing postsecondary studies will benefit from majoring in fields such as human resources. Since administrative analysts spend a lot of time working on computers it can be an asset to take courses that prepare them to use analytical software and computer databases. Earning a relevant associate's or bachelor's degree may be an asset to those seeking employment in this field.

Required Skills

Administrative analysts may work to support a number of other professionals by reviewing data and producing reports so they need to have good time management skills to meet deadlines, as well as good communication skills. They also need analytical skills to effectively review information. Customer service skills are also important as some administrative analysts may provide information to clients. Administrative analysts need strong computer skills to be able to use a wide range of computer programs and software.

Career Outlook and Salary

Administrative analysts are grouped with management analysts by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The occupational listing provide by the BLS for this career field indicates that they should see a job growth rate of 12% during the ten-year period from 2016 to 2026. According to PayScale, as of 2017 administrative analysts earned a median annual income of $52,301.

Related Careers

There are a number of other occupations that rely on professionals having skills similar to those used by administrative analysts. Information about some of these careers, such as operations research analysts, administrative nurses and administrative assistants, can be accessed through the links listed here.

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