Copyright

Best Jobs for Shy People

The best jobs for shy people take on many titles, such as web and software developers, technical writers, physicists, and scientists. Keep reading to get a detailed view of some careers that may appeal to shy people.

View Popular Schools

Career Options for Shy People

Shy people aren't into socializing, so careers that don't involve much communication, and do involve solitary work, would interest them the most. Here we'll review the stats and career information for these types of jobs.

Job Title Median Annual Salary (2016)* Projected Job Growth (2014-2024)*
Web Developers $66,130 27%
Software Developers $102,280 17%
Technical Writers $69,850 10%
Physicists and Astronomers $114,870 7%
Agricultural and Food Scientists $62,920 5%

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

Career Information for Shy People

Web Developers

Web developers make websites and are responsible for their appearance and capabilities, depending if they work front-end or back-end. They discuss with a client what work is to be done and then create the site based on the specifications agreed upon. This involves a small amount of social interaction, particularly through phone or email, but most of the work takes place from a computer. Web developers usually have an associate degree or higher in web design, including programming and graphic design knowledge.

Software Developers

Software developers are solitary workers who design software applications, frameworks, and programs that are then coded by programmers. A software developer may work by themselves in a company office or their own private space, so oral and social skills aren't necessary. Software firms and manufacturing industries employ these professionals. A bachelor's degree in a computer science-related field is the typical requirement for this job.

Technical Writers

Technical writers communicate specialized information by simplifying it into clear and readable prose for the layman. They create guides, manuals, journal articles, press releases, white papers, and so forth. Technical writers may freelance or work at an office, but either way they keep to themselves on the computer. To enter this career, one must be well-versed in a technical area and possess at least a bachelor's degree in a writing discipline.

Physicists and Astronomers

These individuals can work in a number of industries in which they perform theoretical or applied research, make observations, and possibly conduct experiments. They may study molecular or atomic particles, matter, plasma, energy, or cosmological physics. They complete their work mostly at offices, independently, especially astronomers who now frequently do observatory work online. A doctorate in physics or astronomy typically is needed for research positions, but a bachelor's degree may allow individuals to get work with the federal government; while in school students may concentrate in a sub-area of those subjects.

Agricultural and Food Scientists

Agricultural and food scientists seek to enhance the productivity, sustainability, and safety of crops, plants, farm animals, or food. They spend the majority of their time conducting their own research, either in the field or in a laboratory, depending on the industry. Their job doesn't involve a whole lot of interaction, so shy people could find it satisfying. Agricultural and food scientists should have bachelor's degrees or higher in agriculture sciences, and take classes in their specialty.

Next: View Schools

Popular Schools

The listings below may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users.

Find your perfect school

What is your highest level of education?