Copyright

Editor Vs. Publisher

Publishing companies develop the writing the public reads on a daily basis. Publishers oversee these companies, planning the type of content that will succeed for the business, while editors have another important role.

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Comparing Editors to Publishers

Editors revise the work of writers, keeping style, readability, and grammar in mind. Publishers perform similar tasks but also have managerial roles. Other similarities and differences are discussed below.

Job Title Education Requirements Median Salary Job Growth (2016-2026)*
Editor Bachelor's degree in English, Communications, or related field $58,770 (2017)* -1% (for all editors)
Publisher Bachelor's degree in English, Communications, or related field $83,133 (2018) (for executive editors)** -1% (for all editors)

Source: *U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; **PayScale.Com

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Responsibilities of Editors vs. Publishers

Publications generally have a consistent outlook, style, and tone. Publishers are the professionals who develop these elements, through leadership, business knowledge, writing/editing experience, and hiring the right people. Editors work for the publishers by overseeing the work of writers. Editors review and revise written content and keep an open line of communication with writers to guarantee that everyone is on the same page and the final product is successful to the goals of the publication.

Editor

Editors work in the world of publishing, where they coordinate, plan, and revise the written work of a staff or a network of freelancers. Editors may work for book companies, magazines, websites, or newspapers. Daily responsibilities depend on the type of editor and the size of the company. Copy editors review written work focusing on grammar, readability, and if the style matches the goals of the publication and the expectations of the audience. With experience, these editors may work their way up to a higher management position, where they will be more involved with hiring, budgets, and issuing writing assignments. Entry-level editors are generally required to have a bachelor's degree in English, communications, or journalism.

Job responsibilities of an editor include:

  • Meet strict deadlines set by management
  • Confirm the validity of facts and data in the writing
  • Review page layout, such as text and illustration location
  • Boost content interaction through social media promotion

Publisher

Publishers are the main decision makers at a book, magazine, or newspaper publishing company. These roles are generally in upper management with titles such as director of publishing, managing editor, or executive editor. Publishers have the final say in what written work is released, who is doing the writing, and the style and types of stories that will be published in the future. In addition to editing skills, publishers are all-around leaders who must also keep in mind budgets, industry trends, and marketing. Publishers have a bachelor's or advanced degree in English, communications, or journalism, as well as years of experience as an editor and leader of a team of writers.

Job responsibilities of a publisher include:

  • Hire and coordinate a staff of in-house and freelance writers
  • Manage budget reports and contract negotiations
  • Develop the release of content through traditional and non-traditional platforms
  • Craft and implement a company style and direction

Related Careers

If you are interested in the grammatical precision required to be an editor, you may enjoy applying similar skills to becoming a technical writer. If you are interested in publishing, marketing copywriters must combine sharp writing skills with keen business insights.

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