Copyright
 

Associate Degrees in Agribusiness: Program Overviews

Agribusiness associate's programs offer business, agricultural and animal science courses for students looking to become business professionals in agriculture. Learn more about this associate's program, coursework, and career information.

View Popular Schools

Essential Information

Many associate's programs lead to comprehensive agribusiness degrees, while some programs offer specialized degrees in agribusiness merchandising, accounting or agricultural management. Students become proficient in farming techniques, animal handling, corporate agriculture and agronomy. For those interested in further study after completing this program, bachelor's degrees and graduate degrees in the field are available.

To enroll in an associate's degree program in agribusiness, students must have a high school diploma or GED. Although most programs do not require SAT or ACT test scores, placement exams may be required for core math and English courses.


Associate's Degree in Agribusiness Overview

An associate's degree program in agribusiness offers business courses, agricultural courses and hybrid courses that combine elements of both. Students learn to operate and maintain successful agricultural companies and projects through hands-on learning modules in practical agricultural settings. Students also study animal and livestock processes, soils, crops and weed science. Many programs include internship opportunities with local agricultural businesses. Common courses include:

  • Animal science
  • Livestock management
  • Agricultural marketing and promotion
  • Financial accounting
  • Crop and soil science
  • Business communication

Employment Prospects and Salary Information

With a business background, students can seek administrative positions with farms, ranches and agricultural organizations that have available accounting, marketing or management opportunities. Common career options for those with associate's degrees in agribusiness include:

  • Grain merchandiser
  • Agricultural sales representative
  • Livestock manager
  • Agricultural business owner
  • Agricultural inspector
  • Agricultural marketing director

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), there were roughly 12,160 employed buyers and purchasing agents of agricultural products as of 2015. That number was expected to grow at a slower-than-average rate of 5% from 2014 to 2024. The BLS reports that buyers and purchasing agents of agricultural products made a mean annual wage of $62,280 as of May 2015.

Continuing Education Information

Students can obtain a bachelor's degree in animal science, agribusiness or business administration to strengthen their academic qualifications. Additionally, an advanced degree in agricultural studies or animal science can qualify agricultural workers for careers as animal and agricultural scientists. Many agricultural workers also find increased advancement opportunities with government or private agricultural organizations, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov).

An associate's in agribusiness prepare students for a career as merchandisers, inspectors, owners, and more through courses relating to business and agriculture. These programs give students in class coursework, as well as hands-on training and possible internships.

Next: View Schools

Popular Schools

The listings below may include sponsored content but are popular choices among our users.

Find your perfect school

What is your highest level of education?