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How to Help Your Child See the Pros of Summer School

k-12

Is your child feeling a little less than excited about having to attend summer school this year? This blog post offers advice on how to help them see the advantages of attending.

Summer Learning: It Can Be a Blast

Summer school is a relatively common part of the K-12 educational experience. Whether students have certain subjects to catch up on, or they're trying to get ahead for the next school year, many students wind up in the classroom for at least part of their summer vacation. And unsurprisingly, they're not always thrilled about it. However, there are plenty of pros associated with summer school; here are our tips on how to help your children understand them.

Summer school has pros

Emphasize That It'll Make Next Year Easier

Children don't necessarily respond to the same arguments that adults do. If they did, we would have no problem getting our kids to floss their teeth and eat their vegetables. Unfortunately, ''it's good for you'' doesn't make for much of a convincing argument. Instead, message the pros of summer school by focusing on how it'll make your children's lives easier in the near future.

For example, instead of telling your children that summer school is the best way to avoid the ''summer brain drain'' and retain more information from the previous school year, inform them that this option can lead to an easier start in the new school year; they'll have less catching up to do, giving them more play time in the fall. If they're in high school, you might choose to emphasize summer school as a way to graduate from both high school and college earlier.

Use the FOMO Approach

Sometimes we have to think like a child to get through to a child. To that end, find out if any of your kids' friends will also be attending summer school this year. If so, you can harness your children's natural social tendencies to follow their peers by pointing out that attending summer school will give them a chance to spend more time with their friends. This approach can make for a credible pro because no child (or adult, for that matter) wants to suffer from FOMO, or the ''Fear of Missing Out.''

Children learning in the summer

Offer an Effective Reward

As a parent, you probably know that there will be many instances in which you fail to convince your kids that you're ''right'' and have to play the dreaded ''because I said so'' card. Nobody loves it when a situation comes down to that point. If your children are still not convinced that summer school has its pros, you can soften the blow a bit by offering an enticing reward - on the condition that they complete summer school successfully and without complaint. That way, even if you can't convince your kids that they'll be better off academically, they'll still be motivated enough to participate in and put effort into the endeavor.

Students get out of school for summer

If you're a parent looking to promote summer learning, check out Study.com's course index for an engaging content library loved by students of all ages.

By Daisy Rogozinsky
May 2019
k-12 summer learning

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