Broadcast Journalism Degree Program Information

Broadcast journalism degrees teach students on-air and behind-the-scenes skills related to the media, exploring a range of broadcast functions and topics of news media.

Essential Information

Associate's degrees in broadcast journalism are most commonly available at 2-year technical schools and community colleges, while bachelor's degrees are typically offered at 4-year colleges and universities. Students in both programs get basic training in reporting, editing and producing a news broadcast. A high school diploma or GED as well as ACT or SAT scores may be required for associate's and bachelor's candidates.

Master's programs are also available, and they're typically directed at students with broadcast experience. A bachelor's degree and Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores are usually needed for master's candidates.


Associate's Degree in Broadcast Journalism

Associate's degrees in broadcast journalism are often pursued by students seeking to transfer to a 4-year college or university. These programs provide introductory training in the field, and many students gain practical experience at their college's radio station or television studio. Students earning an associate's degree in broadcast journalism receive foundational training in journalism and production techniques. Some common courses are:

  • Introduction to broadcast journalism
  • Broadcast news production
  • Radio news production
  • Investigative reporting
  • Ethics in journalism

Bachelor's Degree in Broadcast Journalism

Bachelor's degree programs in broadcast journalism train students for careers as reporters, producers and other related positions in television and radio news. A background in English, writing and experience with audio-visual equipment is useful for bachelor's candidates, however students often gain extensive hands-on training through their school's radio station or television studio, Additionally, many students gain practical experience by interning at local radio or television stations. Broadcast journalism majors study a wide spectrum of topics related to the creation of TV and radio news. Courses may include:

  • News writing
  • Broadcast news production
  • Photojournalism
  • Investigative reporting
  • Video editing
  • Ethics in journalism

Master's Degree in Broadcast Journalism

Master's degree programs in broadcast journalism are intended for students with some prior experience in journalism or broadcasting. Most programs include extensive studio work, during which students hone their techniques in writing, reporting and producing the news. Students develop advanced investigative reporting and research skills. Additionally, they learn to approach broadcast journalism from a critical and historical perspective. Coursework in broadcast journalism master's degree programs includes advanced study in producing and reporting television and radio news. Some examples of courses are:

  • News writing
  • Radio news production
  • Photojournalism
  • Investigative reporting
  • Video editing
  • Media law

Popular Career Options

A master's degree may open up new job opportunities or qualify broadcast journalists for advancement.

  • News editor
  • Post-secondary instructor
  • News producer
  • Broadcast news correspondent

Employment Outlook and Salary Information

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (www.bls.gov), employment for broadcast news analysts was expected to decrease by 13% between 2014 and 2024, and employment for reporters and correspondents was expected to decrease by 8% during that same period. Factors affecting employment rates include continued consolidation within the industry and increasing online readership. Median wages, as reported in May 2015, varied widely. Reporters and correspondents in general earned a median of $36,360; however, broadcast news analysts earned a median of $65,530.

Students interested in broadcast journalism can pursue associate's, bachelor's, and master's degrees in the field, with several news-related career options on the table. However, employment for broadcast news analysts, reporters and correspondents is expected to decline significantly in the next ten years.


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