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What Does AIDA Mean?

Tahar Harkat, Jennifer Lombardo
  • Author
    Tahar Harkat

    Harkat Tahar is a professional academic researcher with more than 6 years experience. He holds a bachelor and masters degree in business administration from Al Akhawayn University and has experience in teaching various courses that includes managerial finance and research methods.

  • Instructor
    Jennifer Lombardo

    Jennifer Lombardo received both her undergraduate degree and MBA in marketing from Rowan University. She spent ten years in consumer marketing for companies such as Nielsen Marketing Research, The Dial Corporation and Mattel Toys. She is currently an adjunct professor of marketing at Rowan University and a social media marketing consultant.

Understand the AIDA model. Know what AIDA means. Learn AIDA marketing, AIDA approach, AIDA process and framework with the help of examples. Updated: 03/07/2022

Every day, consumers are bombarded with ads designed to capture their attention through different media channels. The advertising industry is becoming more competitive, highlighting the need for a tool to create successful marketing campaigns like the AIDA model.

So, What is AIDA model? What does it stand for? And what does AIDA mean in marketing?

AIDA Model

The AIDA model is used for advertising effect, and it determines the different stages of purchasing a service or a product that a person goes through. According to AIDA marketing consumers follow a series of hierarchical and linear stages, starting from the cognitive, the affective and the final behavioral stage. Amongst the classic models in marketing, the AIDA approach is the best-known one. Marketers suggest this model is very useful as it is applied, consciously or subconsciously, daily for strategy planning, digital marketing, and marketing communications.

AIDA Acronym

The AIDA acronym is illustrated in the diagram below and includes the following four steps:

  • Attention: The first step is to create brand awareness and to attract the consumer's attention through different advertising tools (e.g., catchy YouTube clip, striking window design…).
  • Interest: After catching the attention of the consumer, this interest should be maintained and aroused (e.g., description of the product, how the brand is suitable for lifestyle…).
  • Desire: Once the customer has a favorable attitude towards the product, an ″emotional connection″ should be developed to shift his ″I like it″ mindset to ″I want it″ (e.g., communicating the benefits of the product via ads…)
  • Action: The purchase intention translates into engagement and the action of buying (e.g., making a purchase, engaging in a trial…).


A diagram showing the AIDA model acronym

AIDA Model


Origin of AIDA framework

Elias St. Elmo Lewis was the first to use the term in 1989. After accomplishing a successful career in The Inland Printer, a highly influential American printing magazine, he found three useful principles in advertisement. He started by explaining how advertisement attracts the reader, and catches his interest after reading it, then convinces him to believe what he'is reading. Respecting these principles in order results in a successful advertisement.

These principles are expressed as the AIDA acronym and are commonly adopted in the advertising industry. They have been developed over the years and refined to fit modern tactics of marketing.

Marketing Mix: Promotion

Do you have a favorite television ad? Is there a certain radio jingle that has caught your interest lately? Marketers are constantly searching for promotional ways to gain your attention. You should remember that promotion is one of the elements of the marketing mix, or the Four Ps from our previous lesson.

The promotional mix is made up of advertising, sales promotion, personal selling and public relations. The ultimate goal of promotion is to have the consumer purchase a product or service. If the business is a non -profit, then the main goal would be to convince the consumer to make a donation or take action.

The four components of the AIDA marketing model
AIDA Model Diagram

A model exists concerning how a marketer can attain a promotional goal. This model is called the AIDA concept. The acronym stands for Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. These are the various stages that a consumer moves through when confronted with a promotional message.

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  • 1:55 Attention
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AIDA Process

The AIDA framework includes the following steps in order:

  • Attention

Catching the consumer's attention is the first stage of the AIDA framework. Many marketers make the mistake of overlooking this step, assuming that the customer already knows about the product, which is not always the case. The consumer needs to be first aware of the product. This can be achieved by answering the following questions:

- How can the customer be aware of the product?

- What campaign will be used for brand awareness?

- What message to convey? And through which platform?

  • Interest

Creating and maintaining the interest of the customer is the most challenging part. Although the attention of the customer is captured, will she/he be engaged enough to want to spend more time comprehending the message? Early adopters have a key role as they are the first individuals to try the product and recommend it to others, like celebrities and influencers. The message needs to be communicated in a quick and easy way, through the following questions:

- How can the customer's interest be gained?

- Which content strategy to follow?

- Where and how to make the message available?

  • Desire

Once a customer is gaining interest in the product, the next step comprises making him realize why they need and desire the product. This can be achieved by communicating ideal and unique benefits that are appealing to their personal wants and needs, or by showing how the product can be used in different creative situations. Following are some questions to help complete this step:

- What makes the product so desirable and unique?

- How to create a personal and an emotional connection with the customer?

- Which interaction tool will be used (e.g., posts on social media, immediate responses to comments, online chat…)?

  • Action

The last step is to get the customer to initiate action. The advertisement needs to have a clear message why they should take action quickly, which is known as a call to action. Including incentives like limited time deals and discounts encourages the customer to respond immediately. This can be achieved with the help of questions below:

- Which call to actions will be used and where?

- Where and how easy is it for customers to find the product?

- Which marketing channel(s) to choose (website, emails, phone calls…)?

How Is AIDA Framework Used?

The AIDA approach is an important framework for businesses to develop marketing and advertising campaigns. Each element of the AIDA marketing is differentiated creating an effective journey and maximizing the final result and success of the marketing campaign.

It is a timeless model that has been commonly adopted throughout the years because of its simplicity and straightforwardness. It can be viewed as a checklist to analyze or to improve the message communicated in advertising, presentations, sales talk, and moderation. The aim is to optimize all aspects of the purchasing process.

AIDA Model Example

Many companies adopt the AIDA strategy to guarantee a successful advertisement. Following is an example of how Netflix follows the AIDA model:

The AIDA Model

The main thrust of the model is that consumers respond to a promotional message via cognitive (thinking), affective (feeling) and conative (doing) methods. Let's take you through an example based on a ninja consumer out for a day at the boardwalk. The first way a marketer can get the ninja's attention is through, perhaps, a delicious smell, a vivid sign or loud music. Then, the marketer should have an excellent salesperson ready to demonstrate or explain the product. Lastly, a good advertisement should target the ninja to create desire for the marketer's Ninja Hot Cake Bars. We can take this example and further break it down into the AIDA model.

The AIDA Model: Attention

If the consumer does not know that the marketer's product exists, then they will never consider purchasing the item. The marketer must gain the target market's attention.

Many companies use teaser ads to get consumers to pay attention, such as Infiniti automobiles. When the car company first launched, they broadcasted a series of ads that did not show any cars. The ads were of gorgeous outdoor images and beautiful music. Many consumers stopped what they were doing and viewed these ads because it caught their attention. Another example of getting a consumer's attention would be how large warehouse clubs and supermarkets use their fresh bakery smells to stimulate purchases by getting the consumers attracted to the product through their sense of smell. Lastly, many retailers use large visual images and ads to invite consumers to come into their store to shop. Once the consumer is now aware of the product, the next challenge for the marketer is to create interest.

Ways consumers respond to promotional messages
AIDA Consumer Responses

The AIDA Model: Interest

A consumer that is aware of a product does not always necessarily go ahead and purchase the product. The marketer needs to get the consumer interested enough to desire to purchase the product. One key way a marketer can generate interest would be for the consumer to get hands on experience with the product through demonstrations. The ninja could have a product taste sample of the Hot Cake Bars. They are attracted to the store from the smell. Now, they need to taste the sample.

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Video Transcript

Marketing Mix: Promotion

Do you have a favorite television ad? Is there a certain radio jingle that has caught your interest lately? Marketers are constantly searching for promotional ways to gain your attention. You should remember that promotion is one of the elements of the marketing mix, or the Four Ps from our previous lesson.

The promotional mix is made up of advertising, sales promotion, personal selling and public relations. The ultimate goal of promotion is to have the consumer purchase a product or service. If the business is a non -profit, then the main goal would be to convince the consumer to make a donation or take action.

The four components of the AIDA marketing model
AIDA Model Diagram

A model exists concerning how a marketer can attain a promotional goal. This model is called the AIDA concept. The acronym stands for Attention, Interest, Desire and Action. These are the various stages that a consumer moves through when confronted with a promotional message.

The AIDA Model

The main thrust of the model is that consumers respond to a promotional message via cognitive (thinking), affective (feeling) and conative (doing) methods. Let's take you through an example based on a ninja consumer out for a day at the boardwalk. The first way a marketer can get the ninja's attention is through, perhaps, a delicious smell, a vivid sign or loud music. Then, the marketer should have an excellent salesperson ready to demonstrate or explain the product. Lastly, a good advertisement should target the ninja to create desire for the marketer's Ninja Hot Cake Bars. We can take this example and further break it down into the AIDA model.

The AIDA Model: Attention

If the consumer does not know that the marketer's product exists, then they will never consider purchasing the item. The marketer must gain the target market's attention.

Many companies use teaser ads to get consumers to pay attention, such as Infiniti automobiles. When the car company first launched, they broadcasted a series of ads that did not show any cars. The ads were of gorgeous outdoor images and beautiful music. Many consumers stopped what they were doing and viewed these ads because it caught their attention. Another example of getting a consumer's attention would be how large warehouse clubs and supermarkets use their fresh bakery smells to stimulate purchases by getting the consumers attracted to the product through their sense of smell. Lastly, many retailers use large visual images and ads to invite consumers to come into their store to shop. Once the consumer is now aware of the product, the next challenge for the marketer is to create interest.

Ways consumers respond to promotional messages
AIDA Consumer Responses

The AIDA Model: Interest

A consumer that is aware of a product does not always necessarily go ahead and purchase the product. The marketer needs to get the consumer interested enough to desire to purchase the product. One key way a marketer can generate interest would be for the consumer to get hands on experience with the product through demonstrations. The ninja could have a product taste sample of the Hot Cake Bars. They are attracted to the store from the smell. Now, they need to taste the sample.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What does AIDA stand for?

AIDA stands for the following: Attention (What is it?), Interest (I like it), Desire (I want it), and Action (I'm getting it).

What are the four steps in the AIDA model?

The four steps in the AIDA model are

  • Attention: Raising brand awareness and attention to the product.
  • Interest: Generating interest by communicating the benefits and the unique features of the product.
  • Desire: Shifting the customers' mindset from 'liking it' to 'wanting it'.
  • Action: Moving customers to interact with the company and engage with it using incentives like price drops and promotions.

What is the AIDA concept in marketing?

The AIDA concept is a marketing approach based on four stages and is used to design or optimize an advertising or a marketing campaign, whether it be digital marketing, sales talk, presentations, and more.

What is an AIDA model example?

The company Netflix uses the AIDA model as illustrated below:

  • Attention: Users' attention is captured by the communication channels that Netflix uses.
  • Interest: Netflix offers free trials for its website visitors.
  • Desire: Netflix provides high quality and personalized content without ads.
  • Action: Visitors are encouraged to choose from a variety of subscription plans.

What does AIDA mean in marketing?

The AIDA model helps marketers design effective advertising and marketing campaigns according to the buyer's purchasing behavior process, that is summarized in four stages:

- Attention;

- Interest;

- Desire;

- Action.

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